5530 sick 39% of residents: Health board discloses full extent of Campy in NZ water outbreak

Forty-five people, mostly over 70 were admitted to hospital with campylobacter a Hawke’s Bay District Health Board update reveals.

poop-water-nz-nov-16The DHB has conducted four surveys since the event in August, the latest on September 27 and 28, the results of which they collated with the previous findings.

The surveys were conducted by telephone and the latest figures brought the estimated total number of residents affected by gastroenteritis to 5530 or 39 per cent of Havelock North’s population, 1072 of those confirmed cases.

Of those hospitalised, as of October 10, 27 were aged over 70, followed by four in the 60-69 year age group, four in the 40-49 age group and three in the 50-59 age group.

Four people under the age of 20 also ended up in hospital.

The total number of people who had developed the rare complication from campylobacter, Guillan Barre Syndrome, was reported to be three people. As the incubation time was up to four weeks, it was considered that any new cases now would not be linked to the original outbreak.

Of the estimated 5530 residents who were affected, 32 per cent had a recurrence of the bug, and as of September 28 four people were experiencing ongoing symptoms.

At the time an estimated 78 per cent of people who had symptoms took time off work or school.

Over 100 barfing from water in Finland

More than 100 people have suffered gastrointestinal symptoms as E. coli was found in drinking water in Aanekoski, a small city in central Finland, due to a pipe fracture, Finnish new agency STT reported on Thursday.

metsagroup_aanekoski_765Residents in Aanekoski and surrounding areas were advised to boil the water that they need for preparing food. About 800 households were involved.

Sinikka Rissanen, health inspector from the Environmental Health Service of Aanekoski, estimated on Thursday that at least 100 residents have suffered gastrointestinal symptoms caused by the polluted tap water so far.

Blame the media: Crypto reporting in England

During August 2015, a boil water notice (BWN) was issued across parts of North West England following the detection of Cryptosporidium oocysts in the public water supply.

les_nessmanUsing prospective syndromic surveillance, we detected statistically significant increases in the presentation of cases of gastroenteritis and diarrhea to general practitioner services and related calls to the national health telephone advice service in those areas affected by the BWN.

In the affected areas, average in-hours general practitioner consultations for gastroenteritis increased by 24.8% (from 13.49 to 16.84) during the BWN period; average diarrhea consultations increased by 28.5% (from 8.33 to 10.71). Local public health investigations revealed no laboratory reported cases confirmed as being associated with the water supply. These findings suggest that the increases reported by syndromic surveillance of cases of gastroenteritis and diarrhea likely resulted from changes in healthcare seeking behaviour driven by the intense local and national media coverage of the potential health risks during the event.

 This study has further highlighted the potential for media-driven bias in syndromic surveillance, and the challenges in disentangling true increases in community infection from those driven by media reporting.

The potential impact of media reporting in syndromic surveillance: An example using a possible Cryptosporidium exposure in north west England, August to September 2015

Euro Surveill. 2016;21(41):pii=30368. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2807/1560-7917.ES.2016.21.41.30368

AJ Elliot, HE Hughes, J Astbury, G Nixon, K Brierley, R Vivancos, T Inns, V Decraene, K Platt, I Lake, SJ O’Brien, GE Smith

http://www.eurosurveillance.org/ViewArticle.aspx?ArticleId=22610

Saskatchewan crypto outbreak folks settle additional cases 15 years later

Make people sick, expect to pay; even after over a decade.

According to CBC, the city of North Battleford, the Saskatchewan government and the water folks have $3.3 million for minors who were ill in 2001.

A settlement agreement for minors who had water contaminated with cryptosporidium in North Battleford, Sask., 15 years ago has been given preliminary approval.glass-of-water

Thousands of people got sick in March and April 2001 when the parasite, which can cause diarrhea and vomiting, was found in the city’s drinking water.

In 2003, 700 people were paid compensation from a pool of $3.2 million depending how sick they had been.

The newest settlement applies to those in an “infant class”, people who were under 18 when they got sick. The agreement still needs final approval from the courts on Dec. 1.

Gross: Malaysian factories found making ice from waste water

A local Malay daily has revealed the absolutely disgusting conditions in which ice cubes are made, rendering our thirst-quenching chilled drinks, the most unhygienic ever.

dirty-iceIn an investigative piece today, Sinar Harian reported on the existence of several “rogue” ice factories in the Klang Valley that use waste water to produce ice cubes and ice slabs.

Besides using obviously filthy water unfit for human consumption, the ice is manufactured in extremely unhygienic surroundings as well.

According to the report, one factory that allegedly “recycled” waste water into ice, even channelled this water to the ice-producing machine via pipes that had moss growing on the inside.

It was learned that waste water was preferred as it was already in a cold state and hence froze faster.

This short cut also invariably translated into more products in a shorter time span, and higher profits for the manufacturers.

And the horror does not stop there. If the sight of stray animals scavenging around in the ice processing area at some factories was not enough to make you gag, how about ice cubes stored on rusty trays?

The report said the toilets at these premises were also in a filthy state, and pools of stagnant water in other parts of the factory due to clogged drainage systems only made the manufacture of ice cubes and ice slabs all the more unhygienic.

UK holidaymakers sue Thomas Cook after contracting crypto at hotel where staff were seen ‘fishing feces out of the pool’

Qin Xie of the Daily Mail reports a  group of holidaymakers are suing Thomas Cook after they suffered diarrhea and stomach cramps following a stay at a Greek island resort.

caddyshack-pool-poop-1One of the families, who stayed at Marelen Hotel on Zante in August, claimed that they saw staff fishing out fecal matter from the swimming pool before disinfecting it – all while the guests were still in the water.

Several of those filing the suit have allegedly been diagnosed as having contracted Cryptosporidium staying at the hotel.

A total of 17 people are currently involved in the lawsuit and are represented by personal injury lawyers Irwin Mitchell.

Shigellosis outbreak in Flint, Mich. because people afraid to wash hands

Don’t eat poop (and if you do, make sure it’s cooked).

Wash your hands.

handwash_south_park2These are the basics of public health.

Most of us are taught from a very early age that hand-washing is an easy, essential way of keeping ourselves clean and healthy. But residents of Flint, Michigan and surrounding areas have been forgoing this common practice out of fear of the water’s toxicity. Genesee county, of which Flint is a the largest city, and the adjacent county of Saginaw combined have experienced an outbreak of 131 cases of Shigellosis (named after the bacteria that causes it, Shigella). It’s a bloody diarrheal disease transmitted via tiny amounts of contaminated fecal matter. It typically lasts about a week, but can also cause patients to feel like they have to go to the bathroom even when they have no more waste in their systems. Additionally, the US Centers for Disease Control (CDC) also notes that “may be several months before [patients] bowel habits are entirely normal.”

In 2013, there were just under five cases reported per every 100,000 people in America. The outbreak in Michigan far exceeds that number, and it’s likely because residents in the area are afraid to use their tap water, which was found to have toxic levels of lead, a heavy metal that can cause neurological problems when it builds up in the body, in 2015. Even though the water was deemed safe for consumption with a proper filter, people in the area are still scared to wash their hands at all, according to the Washington Post.

Instead, they’re cleaning themselves using baby wipes—aren’t nearly as effective as disinfectant as good old-fashioned scrubbing—which should take about 20 seconds to ensure that any potential pathogens are washed down the drain.

“Some people have mentioned that they’re not going to expose their children to the water again,” Jim Henry, Genesee County’s environmental health supervisor, told CNN.

 

Wisconsin health officials report two cases of cryptosporidiosis

Waukesha County health officials said Thursday they’re investigating two confirmed cases of cryptosporidiosis.

diaper-poolThose affected recently swam at the Princeton Club in New Berlin, but the original source is unknown, a county spokeswoman said.

“Princeton Club has been very cooperative, have followed all Waukesha County Environmental Health requirements and have taken steps that go above and beyond the standards to ensure appropriate prevention steps are taken,” Julianne Davan said in a statement.

She said it’s not uncommon for annual reports of cryptosporidiosis, and the number of cases in Waukesha County this year is consistent with previous years.

Going public – Not: Michigan state epidemiologist didn’t publicly report Flint-area disease outbreak

Jeff Karoub of the Boston Globe reports Michigan’s former state epidemiologist acknowledged in a plea deal Wednesday that she was aware of dozens of cases of Legionnaires’ disease in the Flint area around the same time the city changed its water source, but that she didn’t report it to the general public.

corrinemiller_1473865031626_46311380_ver1-0_640_480Corrine Miller, the former director of disease control and prevention at the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services, faced three charges stemming from the investigation into Flint’s lead-contaminated water crisis. She pleaded no contest to a misdemeanor of willful neglect of duty in exchange for prosecutors dropping felony misconduct and conspiracy charges.

Flint switched from Detroit’s water system to the Flint River to save money in 2014. But tests later showed that the river water was improperly treated and coursed through aging pipes and fixtures, releasing toxic lead.

The plea agreement states that Miller was aware of the Legionnaires’ cases in 2014, and reported to someone identified only as ‘‘Suspect 2’’ that the outbreak ‘‘was related to the switch in the water source’’ after compiling data about the illness in Genesee County. No explanation is given in the plea deal as to why the cases weren’t publicly reported.

A definitive connection between the corrosive river water and Legionnaires’ has not been made, but many experts believe it probably was the cause.

 

Chlorine is your friend, but chlorinating water in Christchurch’s northwest is off the table

As the third case of Guillain-Barre Syndrome has been linked to the Campylobacter contamination of Havelock North’s water supply, New Zealand, chlorinating water in Christchurch’s northwest is off the table, for now.

eight_col_1m1a9865The Christchurch City Council went against its own staff advice and unanimously decided on Thursday not to consider temporarily chlorinating the water from eight shallow wells that feed into three pump stations, serving about 20,000 residents.

The council instead decided to accelerate a $16 million programme to replace 22 shallow bores, supplying 80,000 northwest households.

The work was originally due to be finished by June 30, 2018, but most of the wells would now be decommissioned by March 2017. Fourteen of the most vulnerable shallow wells have already either been decommissioned or shut down.

Accelerating the work would cost an additional $480,000.

The council would also embark on a programme to raise community awareness of the risks of drinking untreated water from the shallow bores.

Canterbury’s medical officer of health, Alistair Humphrey, last month asked the council to explain why its continued use of the shallow wells did not present “an untenable risk”. Humphrey’s request was prompted by a gastro outbreak caused by campylobacter in the water supplying the town of Havelock North in Hawke’s Bay.

Staff will now talk to Humphrey to see if he was satisfied with the council’s response, without chlorinating the water. They will report back to the council in November.

Water from the bores was tested for E.coli daily, but it took at least 24 hours to get the results, so there was always a 24-hour period where contamination could go undetected, council three waters and waste boss John Mackie said.

He said the council complied with the water standards, but his professional advice to the council was to chlorinate the water, which would eliminate the risk.

Mayor Lianne Dalziel asked Mackie if the risk from the shallow bores had changed in the last few years. He said no.

She said it was only the perception of risk that had been heightened since the Havelock North contamination.