Mermaid Beach Bangkok Thai owner has ordered to pay more than $20,000

Mermaid Beach is a lovely spot on Australia’s Gold Coast.

Vinya Chantra.bankok.thaiThis Thai restaurant, not so much.

Alexandria Utting of the Gold Coast Bulletin reports Mermaid Beach restaurant Bangkok Thai was the subject of legal proceedings in the Southport Magistrates Court after business owner Vinya Chantra (right) and the company to which he is a director, Chantra Enterprises, were charged with three counts of failing to comply with food standards codes.

The charges came after council inspectors found the popular Thai restaurant in a “gross level of filth” with food waste, dirt, grime and rodent droppings on tables used to prepare food.

The court heard the restaurant had received improvement notices for cleanliness on several occasions since September 2012, but had only paid one fine of $580 for a breach of food safety laws in 2015.

Magistrate John Costanzo individually fined Chantra $2,955 for allowing food safety breaches in his business.

He was also ordered to pay $1,250 to council in costs and $89.90 for the filing of court documents.

The company Chantra Enterprises was separately fined $14,725, as well as costs and filing fees.

UK restaurateur sentenced to 6 years after peanut allergy death

The owner of an Indian takeaway in North Yorkshire has been found guilty of manslaughter after a customer with a nut allergy was served a meal containing ground peanuts.

food.allergensThe trial was told Mohammed Zaman had cut corners by swapping the thickening agent almond powder for the cheaper groundnut powder, which contained peanuts.

Although the vast majority of restaurants are safe, a number each year are found to have breached laws and guidelines.

Since December 2014, takeaways and restaurants have been required by law to let customers know if any of the 14 most dangerous allergens are ingredients in their food.

They include peanuts, eggs, milk, fish, crustaceans and mustard.

Paul Wilson, 38, who suffered an anaphylactic shock after eating a meal from Zaman’s business, died before the change in the law, but the trial heard he had flagged up his peanut allergy to the restaurant and his meal had been labelled as “nut free”.

Another customer with a nut allergy had to be treated at a hospital after eating at Mr. Zaman’s restaurant three weeks before Mr. Wilson’s death. Like him, she had been assured her meal would not contain nuts, prosecutors said.

Mr. Zaman was convicted of manslaughter by gross negligence in the death of Mr. Wilson, and six food safety offenses. He was sentenced to six years in prison.

indian gardenHe had a “reckless and cavalier attitude to risk,” the prosecutor, Richard Wright, told a jury at Teesside Crown Court.

It marked the first time in Britain that someone has been convicted of manslaughter over the sale of food.

David Pickering, of the Chartered Trading Standards Institute (CTSI), said: “Some [restaurants] will have it in a book, some will give you the information verbally. If they can’t give you it, don’t eat there.”

Cross contamination nightmare

From the Retail Hell Underground:

I work for a supermarket in the Fresh Fish department. I actually enjoy the job, most of the time that is, but everyone has horror stories. This was an amusing thing that happened shortly after I started the job.

Fish HeadSo we had a sale on Whole Salmon at £4 a kilogram (around $2.50 for a pound, give or take for Americans). It was an incredibly good sale, and whenever the sale is on the department is absolutely rammed with customers. I don’t really mind as the day goes quicker and our sales go through the roof. The vast majority of customers don’t want the Salmon whole as it is, and ask for it filleting, which we are happy to offer and do for them even if it takes a bit longer. I was just about to go for my lunch, but as we had a lot of orders for whole salmon that needed filleting I decided I would stay for longer and help my colleagues get through it. In comes a customer who looks absolutely bewildered, lets call him AB.

Me: Hello Sir, how may I help you today?

AB: The whole salmon, how much is it?

Me: It is on special offer at £4 per kilogramme.

AB: No, how much are THEY?!? I don’t work in kilogrammes. (Despite the fact that the retail sector has been using metric weights for over 30 years and the man didn’t look older than his 50s)

Me: Well it works out at under £2 per pound and they are each individually priced as you can see, they range from between £10 to £16 each depending on which one you want sir.

AB: Give me that one!

Me: Okay sir how would you like it? As it is whole or filleted?

AB: I would like it filleting… quickly please!

Me: I’ll try get through it as soon as I can sir, it shouldn’t take more than 5 minutes. Would you like me to pin bone it?

AB: I SAID FILLETING THANK YOU!!!

Me: No problem, I’ll have it ready for you as soon as possible.

The customer was being irate, but as it was a hot day I didn’t really think much of it as everyone seems to get more aggravated when the sun comes out. I quickly filleted the fish, not bothering to pin bone it as he stated he just wanted it filleting, bagged it up and left it in the back up chiller for when he came back to pick it up. He comes back, I gave it to him and he seemed happy enough. I didn’t think more of it and went for my lunch.

As I came back to the department after my lunch I barely had my apron on when he came rushing back to the department.

AB: There are bones in my fish!

ME: Well yes, you said you didn’t want it pin boning.

AB: CAN YOU REMOVE THEM! I’M NOT EATING MY FISH WITH BLOODY BONES.

ME: Sure thing, but in future when asked if you want it pin boning please reply yes.

AB: (muttering under his breath) …ohh, right.

So I pin bone the fish, but I notice it all crumbled up to the bottom of the bag and it is incredibly wet. My colleague is speaking to the absolutely bewildered customer, and he suddenly bursts out laughing. I’m not really listening to the conversation, but I finish pin-boning the fish and give it back to him and he looks rather embarrassed but thanks me really nicely, like a total mood change.

So I ask my colleague what they were talking about. Supposedly the customer had gone to the customer bathroom after he paid for his shopping, and dropped the salmon in the actual toilet by accident, and he ran the salmon fillets under the water in the sink to clean it as if that would magically get rid of all the bacteria.

This man had just dropped his salmon in the toilet, without telling me, and expected me to handle it again and use a clean surface to de-bone it. Cross contamination nightmare! Me and my colleague had a good chuckle as he got what he deserved.

And that is how I ended up spending the next hour disinfecting the hell out one of our work areas.

How these people manage in daily life is beyond me haha.

German cockroaches invade filthy UK takeaway

The owners of the Chick ‘N’ Spice takeaway were fined and the premises were closed after inspectors found an infestation of German cockroaches.

cockroach_1_finEaling Council food safety officers found the cockroach infestation around a chest freezer in the takeaway, with evidence of adults, nymphs and egg casings.

The borough’s cabinet member for safety, culture and community services, Councillor Ranjit Dheer, said: “The vast majority of food outlets in Ealing comply with hygiene requirements.

“The council responded swiftly to tackle the serious and inexcusable hygiene breaches committed by Chick ‘N’ Spice, and had no hesitation closing the premises to protect public safety.”

£30k fine slapped on UK Indian takeway owner after pools of blood found in freezer

A takeaway boss has been forced to pay out more than £33,000 after health inspectors found pools of blood in a freezer and cobwebs on light fittings at his business.

Maya takeaway Salik Mohammed Miah, 42, the owner of Maya takeaway in Polesworth, was handed one of the largest fines in the history of North Warwickshire Borough Council after a catalogue of hygiene horrors were exposed during an inspection.

Uncovered boxes of prawns, chicken and rice were also discovered along with containers of curry sauce stored on the floor and a dirty sink containing disgusting cloths and sponges.

Oh Kansas, what is wrong? Downtown Lawrence restaurant reopens day after closing for nearly 100 live roaches

A downtown Lawrence restaurant voluntarily closed its doors earlier this month after a health inspector discovered nearly 100 live roaches on the premises.

Yokohama SushiA day later, Yokohama Sushi, 811 New Hampshire St., reopened. For area diners unfamiliar with the inspection process, it may seem like a fast turnaround, but a Kansas Department of Agriculture spokesperson called it a typical timeline.

On May 2, a restaurant inspection at Yokohama discovered the roaches, explained Heather Lansdowne, a spokesperson for the KDA. The next day, the restaurant voluntarily closed its doors and underwent a follow-up inspection, which found additional live roaches, though fewer in number. A pest control company was called in to treat the restaurant for the insects, caulking and baiting areas around water lines, crevices, cracks and near equipment, according to the inspector’s report. A second follow-up inspection later that day discovered no roaches, and the restaurant was listed back in compliance with health codes, the report says.

The restaurant reopened May 4.

A Yokohama representative did not return phone calls from the Journal-World seeking comment for this story.

When asked whether a single day of work was enough to clear up a significant roach problem and make a restaurant sanitary for its customers, Lansdowne said the restaurant followed a usual pattern based on the department’s standards.

‘Maybe you’re not used to spicy food’ SinCity Thai shut down after customers complain of foodborne illness

SinCity Thai Restaurant was shut down after receiving several customer complaints of foodborne illness. 

SinCity ThaiAccording to the complaint filed May 10, three customers that ate the beef pad thai and chicken pad thai reported diarrhea hours later. 

13 Action News spoke to the manager of SinCity Thai, Unchanlee Karnchai, who said the customers may not be used to the spicy food. 

“It could be the food or because they cannot handle the spicy food,” said Karnchai. 

After the complaints, the Southern Nevada Health District went in to investigate. 

In a report, they found multiple violations, including, a sanitizer bucket that was originally on the floor was moved near a food prep area next to a cutting board and green onions. 

They also found multiple food that was left at room temperature. Including, thawing beef that sit next to dirty dishes and waste. 

“Employees hadn’t been trained on what they had to do that day,” Karnchai explained. 

There were also several employee violations, including, employees not washing their hands and the kitchen hand sink did not have soap or paper towels. 

Honey Pig fails second health inspection this year

In Georgia, USA, why not have Gwinnett County’s most popular Korean barbecue named Honey Pig, and fail its second health inspection this year. 

honey.pig
Honey Pig, located at 3473 Old Norcross Road in Duluth
, received a 53/U during its Wednesday inspection. It was the same score health inspectors gave it during a January evaluation.

During Wednesday’s inspection, officials noted “multiple foods not covered in walk in cooler,” improperly cooling radish soup and unlabeled spices. According to the inspection report, “large food service containers” were also stored outside the restaurant and a hand-washing sink was “gushing water at the seams.”

Daisy_DukesWednesday’s failure was the second straight on a routine inspection for Honey Pig, which bills itself as “Atlanta’s No. 1 Korean barbecue restaurant” and allows diners to cook their own meals on tabletop grills. During the restaurant’s failed January 19 inspection, officials reportedly saw a live spider crawling in dried soup stock. Points were also taken off for potential contamination of raw beef. The restaurant scored a 96/A on the follow-up to that inspection.

Yes Virginia, even scientists get Norovirus

The New Mexican reports more than 30 top scientists attending a symposium in Santa Fe earlier this month were sickened in an outbreak of Norovirus.

santa.barf_sprout_raw_milk(7)The conference at the Hilton Santa Fe Historic Plaza hotel drew 251 people, including participants from the University of California-Berkeley, Stanford, Harvard and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, as well as various prestigious biomedical research centers here and abroad.

And unfortunately between 30 and 40 of them experienced sudden bouts of vomiting, diarrhea and stomach cramps, according to the state health department.

One person went to the hospital, another to urgent care, but no one was hospitalized and nobody had complications.

The cause is undetermined and might remain so, said David Selvage, bureau chief for the Infectious Disease Epidemiology Bureau.

Keystone Symposia on Molecular and Cellular Biology, which hosted the event, is a nonprofit that convenes peer-reviewed conferences across a range of life sciences. It’s a regular visitor to Santa Fe and plans other conferences in the city later this year and in 2017. The one that opened May 2 was titled “Epigenetic and Metabolic Regulation of Aging and Aging-Related Diseases.”

The Hilton notified the health department and took immediate precautions by ordering in food for the symposium from outside vendors, even though there was no determination that the source of the norovirus was the hotel kitchen.

“They really wanted to do the right thing and did,” Selvage said.

In fact, because there were no other complaints from other hotel guests, Selvage suspects the origin was something else — person-to-person transmission or a food item shared by many people at the symposium. “If it was a food handler, you would expect other groups attending events there to become ill and we didn’t see that,” he said.

The health department, he said, collected three specimens from people attending the conference and the state lab reported May 10 that all were positive for norovirus.

The state lab does not have a test for determining the presence of norovirus in food.

FSSAI adds restaurant hygiene to its menu

The Food Safety and Standards Authority of India (FSSAI) has turned its attention to restaurants, eating joints and hotels to enforce hygiene standards.
A sub-group consisting of industry bodies like the National Restaurant Association of India (NRAI) and the Federation of Hotel and Restaurant Associations of India (FHRAI) and the FSSAI have been formed to amend rules that govern safety standards at eating establishments.

Food-Safety-and-Standards-Authority-of-India-FSSAIThe sub-group was formed following a meeting last week in New Delhi among the FSSAI, NRAI, FHRAI as well as popular fast-food companies like Yum! and hotel groups like Taj and ITC.

FSSAI Chief Executive Officer Pawan Kumar Agarwal, while confirming the development to Business Standard, said enforcing food safety standards at eating places was a must.

“Hotels, restaurants and eating joints need an FSSAI licence to operate but food safety standards are not necessarily met. We wanted to get a sense of what the industry’s view was on the subject and whether they were open to the idea of stringent enforcement,” Agarwal said.