‘We found Salmonella in some of the cooked food from the restaurant, as well as in some raw food.’ That’s not good

In North Carolina folks vacation at the beach or in the mountains. The idea is to get a bunch of people together in a house and cook/eat/drink and recharge. In Ontario (that’s in Canada) people relax and party in cottages that line the hundreds of lakes north of Toronto.

I spent this past weekend in cottage country, as it’s known, celebrating my parents anniversary with a bunch of family and friends.IMG_0978

One of the popular Southern Ontario-to-the-cottage roads travels through Bradford. Home of a marsh, Chicago Blackhawk Brandon Mashinter, and over 20 confirmed cases of salmonellosis linked to St. Louis Bar and Grill.

According to 104.5 CHUM FM, the restaurant has been closed twice in the past three weeks due to illnesses.

22 cases have been confirmed by lab testing and another 18 people have symptoms that are consistent with Salmonella.

Dr. Colin Lee with the Simcoe Muskoka District Health Unit says the restaurant had to be closed on May 31st and then again on June 15th-16th to allow for food samples to be taken and proper disinfection.

“We found Salmonella in some of the cooked food from the restaurant, as well as in some raw food.”

In a statement provided to NEWSTALK 1010, St. Louis Bar & Grill says the safety and well-being of its customers and staff are its highest priorities. The company underlined that it has been working closely with the local health unit and that its Bradford location is open as normal.

“On two occasions (May 31 and June 15), we cooperated fully with the Simcoe Muskoka Health Unit to close the restaurant for inspection, sanitization and disinfection. On both occasions, the Health Unit was satisfied that there was no risk to public safety and cleared us to re-open within a few hours (May 31) and the next day (June 15).”

There is always a risk to public safety when food is involved. It’s up to restaurant operators to reduce the risks. Salmonella in raw and cooked food isn’t an indicator of good risk management.

Sporadic illnesses, outbreak illnesses, are similiar

Outbreak data have been used to estimate the proportion of illnesses attributable to different foods. Applying outbreak-based attribution estimates to non-outbreak foodborne illnesses requires an assumption of similar exposure pathways for outbreak and sporadic illnesses. This assumption cannot be tested, but other comparisons can assess its veracity.

vomit-FBOur study compares demographic, clinical, temporal, and geographic characteristics of outbreak and sporadic illnesses from Campylobacter, Escherichia coli O157, Listeria, and Salmonella bacteria ascertained by the Foodborne Diseases Active Surveillance Network (FoodNet). Differences among FoodNet sites in outbreak and sporadic illnesses might reflect differences in surveillance practices. For Campylobacter, Listeria, and Escherichia coli O157, outbreak and sporadic illnesses are similar for severity, sex, and age. For Salmonella, outbreak and sporadic illnesses are similar for severity and sex. Nevertheless, the percentage of outbreak illnesses in the youngest age category was lower.

Therefore, we do not reject the assumption that outbreak and sporadic illnesses are similar.

Comparing characteristics of sporadic and outbreak-associated foodborne illnesses, United States, 2004-2011

Emerging Infectious Diseases, Volume 22, Number 7, July 2016, DOI: 0.3201/eid2207.150833

E.D. Ebel, M.S. Williams, D. Cole, C.C. Travis, K.C. Klontz, N.J. Golden, R.M. Hoekstra

http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/eid/article/22/7/15-0833_article

Going public: Kale sucks and sickened 6 with Salmonella in Minn. in April

Posting a product recall (alert) notice on a company website, and then quickly removing it, is like putting down sugar to ward off ants. For the few remaining investigative journalists, such actions are akin to painting a bullseye on the company for further questioning.

spongebob.oil.colbert.may3.10And it shouldn’t be that way.

There is a scientific, public health and moral reason to make outbreaks known, whether product is still on the shelves or not. It’s how the rest of us mere mortals learn, it’s how to make things better, it’s the right thing to do.

Anyone who hides behind legalese is not worthy of trust – especially the consumer faith and trust that goes into every food purchase — because industry government, and academia rationalize a Chomsky-esque form of self-censorship that is barf-inducing to watch, and made worse by the Salmonella.

Coral Beach, formerly of The Packer and now with Bill Marler’s Food Safety News, reports that government and corporate entities failed to reveal in April that they were investigating a cluster of Salmonella illnesses in which at least five out of six victims reported eating Taylor Farms Organic Kale Medley Power Greens Mix purchased at various Sam’s Club locations.

After a notice on another company’s website — Pacific Coast Fruit Co. of Portland — brought the situation to light, Taylor Farms’ chairman and CEO Bruce Taylor confirmed that Minnesota officials had notified him about the investigation. However, it is not clear to whom Taylor issued his May 6 statement, which was still not available on the Taylor Farms website as of May 15.

Taylor’s statement, provided to Food Safety News on May 14, says:

organic.kale.screen.shot“On Thursday, May 5th, Taylor Farms was informed by the Minnesota Department of Health (MDH) and Minnesota Department of Agriculture (MDA) of an investigation of reported foodborne illness.

“In April, six people with Salmonella Enteritidis infections, with the same rare DNA fingerprint pattern, were reported to the MDH. All of those infected are from the state of Minnesota. All are recovering.

“The FDA is not requiring any action from Taylor Farms and we are not issuing any formal recalls. We will continue to work with the MDH and MDA regarding this issue.

“The safety and health of the consumers who buy our products has always and will always be the highest priority for us. We will continue to strive to deliver the industry highest quality, safest produce in the industry.”

Pleeeeassse.

Although Taylor did not reference a specific product or where it was distributed, the Pacific Coast Fruit Co. notice named Sam’s Club and said the retailer pulled Taylor Farms Organic Kale Medley Power Greens Mix from shelves nationwide on April 4.

The Pacific Coast Fruit notice, dated May 6, was available on the company’s website May 14, but has since been removed. The notice carried the headline “Taylor Farms-Organic Kale Medley Recall” and was addressed to “our customers and the Pacific Coast Fruit Team.”

Minnesota officials did not respond to weekend requests for comment on the situation. Similarly, no one from Pacific Coast Fruit or Sam’s Club responded this weekend to requests for comment.

The Pacific Coast Fruit notice said six people with Salmonella enteritidis infections, all with the same rare DNA fingerprint pattern, were reported to MDH in April. The victims ranged in age from 7 to 69 and their illnesses began between April 3 and April 26. One person was hospitalized, and all are recovering, according to Pacific Coast Fruit.

“Five of the ill people in Minnesota reported eating Taylor Farms Organic Kale Medley purchased at several Sam’s Club locations, and the source of the sixth person’s illness is under investigation,” Pacific Coast Fruit’s notice said.

An external communications spokesman for Taylor Farms said May 15 that the Salinas, CA, company did not need to issue a recall.

“No recall was needed because the issue being investigated was from back in late March early April. So, independent of the findings of the investigation, the product is no longer in the market place due to shelf-life limitations,” the Taylor Farms spokesman said.

OrganicKaleMedley-1web-216x300The failure of public health officials and corporate entities to announce the spike in Salmonella cases and the subsequent investigation is the latest incident in what one food safety professional says is a disturbing, decade-long trend.

After the deadly E. coli outbreak in 2006 that was linked to bagged fresh spinach, companies have increasingly demanded governmental agencies provide confirmation results from time-consuming follow-up laboratory tests before issuing voluntary product recalls, said Douglas Powell, former professor at Kansas State University’s Department of Diagnostic Medicine/Pathobiology.

Powell, who now lives in Australia, is publisher of barfblog.com, which has been monitoring and publicizing foodborne illness outbreaks since 2006 (1993, when Food Safety Network started), coined the phrase “leafy green cone of silence” to describe the lack of transparency on the part of government and industry in the decade since the spinach outbreak.

“This situation fits the pattern,” Powell told Food Safety News May 15. “It’s part of a bigger picture about the question of when to go public about outbreak investigations.

“There’s a question of public health. I don’t care that the product’s not on the shelves any more. The public has a right and a need to know about these incidents.”

do.the.right.thingBill Marler, partner at the Seattle law firm Marler Clark LLP, had similar concerns. Marler has been representing victims of foodborne illnesses since the 1993 E. coli outbreak traced to undercooked hamburgers served by the Jack in The Box chain. He provided testimony to Congress during the drafting of the Food Safety Modernization Act.

“My main concern is the lack of transparency, and that’s not just a comment on Taylor Farms, it’s a comment on FDA, the Minnesota departments of health and agriculture and a comment on the CDC,” Marler said May 15. “I think that anytime, especially when there are illnesses involved, I think the public has an absolute right to know what’s going on.

“My assumption is that someone’s determined that the product is no longer in the marketplace because it’s a perishable product and the public’s no longer at risk. While I appreciate that, it’s not a reason to not let consumers know.

“In order for the free market to work, in order for consumers to know what products are safe or safer, the companies and the government have a responsibility to educate the consumer.

“When they withhold that kind of information, for whatever justifiable reason they think they have, it doesn’t give (consumers) the information to know how to protect themselves and their families and also calls into question public health’s commitment to the public’s health.”

 

When it’s not the potato salad, it’s the ham

I used to eat a lot of ham sandwiches. It was the only lunch meat I’d take to school from about age 8 until I finished high school.

It’s still my preferred quick-service deli sandwich meat.

And we bake one at home a couple of times a year, making one large enough to have a few days of leftovers.

Photo Courtesy- National Pork Board

Ham can be risky though. In 1997 Neil Young missed a bunch of shows after cutting his finger while making a ham sandwich.

According to a paper by Huedo and colleagues in Food Pathogens and Disease, a couple of years ago over 40 Italian school kids got sick with salmonellosis linked to ham.

A multischool outbreak of salmonellosis caused by Salmonella enterica serovar Napoli was investigated in the province of Milan from October to November 2014, following an increase in school absenteeism coinciding with two positive cases. Epidemiological studies detected 47 cases in four primary schools: 46 children and 1 adult woman (51.4% males and 48.6% females, median age 8.9). From these, 14 cases (29.8%) were severe and resulted in hospitalization, including 6 children (12.8%) who developed an invasive salmonellosis. The epidemic curve revealed an abnormally long incubation period, peaking 1 week after the first confirmed case. Twenty-five available isolates were typed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis showing an identical pattern. The isolate belongs to ST474, an ST composed exclusively of Salmonella Napoli human strains isolated in France and Italy. Antibiotic resistance analysis showed resistance to aminoglycosides, correlating with the presence of the aminoglycoside resistance gene aadA25 in its genome. Trace-back investigations strongly suggested contaminated ham as the most likely food vehicle, which was delivered by a common food center on 21 October. Nevertheless, this ingredient could not be retrospectively investigated since it was no longer available at the repository. This represents the largest Salmonella Napoli outbreak ever reported in Italy and provides a unique scenario for studying the outcome of salmonellosis caused by this emerging and potentially invasive nontyphoidal serotype.

Leafy greens, listeria, environmental sampling and tragedy

Dole’s Springfield plant, source of an awful outbreak of listeriosis linked to over 30 illnesses and four deaths, had resident Listeria monocytogenes problem.

With illnesses stretching back to July 2015, confirmed through the amazing whole genome sequencing, the pathogen was hanging out somewhere.

Matt Sanctis of the Springfield News-Sun and I chatted yesterday about the FDA 483 reports posted by folks last week and we talked about environmental testing, best practices and what happens when a positive result is found.ryser_conveyer1

There are lots of risk management decisions and trade offs in environmental sampling – where to test, what to look for, what to do when you find something – all of which United Fresh has fantastic guidance about.

The big questions that folks have are is Lm in the leafy green processing environment common? (yes – see here. And here. and here. And another Dole one. That’s just going back 2 years); should firms be testing food contact surfaces? (it’s complicated – depends why you are testing and what else you are looking for); and, did Dole react correctly when they found listeria in the environment nine times in 2 years (I dunno, there’s not a lot of info).

The idea of environmental sampling is to seek out residential Lm and get rid of it. To accomplish that, positive test results lead to further testing (closer to the product) and an investigation into the cause.

Internal tests at Dole showed positive signs of listeria as early as 2014, according to U.S. Food and Drug Administration inspection reports obtained by the Springfield News-Sun.

Dole performed swab tests at its Springfield facility that tested positive for listeria as many as nine times, beginning in July 2014, the inspection reports show. However the company continued to produce and ship products across the U.S. and Canada.

Dole confirmed Monday that it has been contacted by the U.S. Department of Justice as part of an investigation into its Springfield facility. A listeria outbreak there has been linked to four deaths and several illness across the U.S. and Canada.

The FDA released the inspection reports Monday in response to Freedom of Information Act requests the News-Sun filed in January and March.

“Those FDA reports deal with issues at our plant that we have corrected,” said Bil Goldfield, a Dole spokesman. “We have been working in collaboration with the FDA and other authorities to implement ongoing improved testing, sanitation and procedure enhancements, which have resulted in the recent reopening of our Springfield plant.”

It’s concerning the company continued to ship products after finding several positive samples of listeria over a span of more than a year, said Bill Marler, a food safety attorney based in Seattle. Marler represents the family of Kiki Christofield in their lawsuit against Dole.

“The thing that is concerning to me is you’re finding listeria repeatedly over a long period of time,” Marler said. “It’s less of an issue of should they have told the FDA. It’s more of an issue of should they have shut down their facility and gotten a handle on why they continue to have an ongoing listeria problem?”

“The finished product sample, as well as the in-process sub-samples collected from the water knife, the trans-slicer, and the metal tray beneath the cross-conveyor, all on Trim Line 1, were found by FDA laboratory analysis to be positive for Listeria monocytogenes,” the FDA report says.

Employees at Dole didn’t swab food contact areas for listeria, according to the inspection reports, instead swabbing various locations throughout the facility as close to food contact areas as possible.

More information is needed to determine whether Dole failed its duty to consumers or what steps it took after finding positive samples of listeria in its facility, said Benjamin Chapman, an associate professor and food safety specialist at North Carolina State University.

One key question the FDA reports don’t fully answer is whether the listeria samples were brought into the factory on a product like lettuce or whether it established a foothold within the facility, which Chapman said would be a more serious problem.

It’s also important to know what — if anything — Dole did to resolve the issue, he said.

“It’s not surprising there would be listeria there,” Chapman said. “What we don’t know is if those nine times they found it, whether it was transient or if it was resident. They might know that and they might not. It really depends on what they did further once they found those samples.”

Fancy food ain’t safe food, Australian Brisbane Hilton edition: 50 sickened at wedding reception, show us the menu

More than 50 people have fallen ill, including a groom, after a suspected mass food poisoning at a Brisbane wedding reception.

HBNEQUEENSBALLOOM_FPPublic health officials are probing the cause of the outbreak among people who attended the reception at the Hilton Brisbane last Friday.

At least three of the reception guests were so ill with gastroenteritis they sought hospital treatment.

Metro North Public Health Unit physician James Smith said the wedding reception, attended by about 150 people, was catered for by both the Hilton and an external caterer.

Hotel staff contacted Queensland Health when they became aware guests had fallen ill after the reception. Dr Smith said public health officials were working with Hilton management and the Brisbane City Council to investigate the gastrointestinal illness.

Last night, Hilton Hotel Brisbane general manager Chris Partridge said the hotel had been “as co-operative and helpful as we possibly can” to find out the cause of the outbreak.

Mr Partridge said Queensland Health had inspected the hotel’s kitchens and had “left quite satisfied”.

Food poisoning linked to noodle stall at Canberra market

The Canberra Times reports several cases of food poisoning have been possibly linked to a stall at the Enlighten Night Noodle Markets, ACT Health says.

Enlighten Night Noodle MarketsThe market-goers became ill with diarrhea about 10 to 13 hours after eating food from a stall at the festival, but ACT Health Protection Service was confident there was no ongoing risk to public health from food sold at the stall as the outbreak has been controlled.

Environmental Health Officers inspected the premises that supplied food for the stall on Friday and found potentially hazardous food out of temperature control which was disposed of.

The stall will not be able to sell the implicated food for the remainder of the markets.

Fairfax Events’ head of food James Laing said organisers had notified ACT Health after they were contacted by three people who said they’d become ill after eating at one of the stalls.

“[Inspectors] went to the restaurant of the stallholder, had a look and checked the refrigeration on site and there were no concerns, but to be ultra cautious they took the product and destroyed it and did some tests,” he said.

“We take the issue of food safety incredibly seriously and work closely with the relevant health authorities to ensure that patrons can come to the markets confident that the highest standards are being adhered to.”

Mr Laing said it would remain unclear if the food poisoning was caused by the stall until the test results come back next Tuesday, adding, “The menu item in question we removed tonight, the stall is still trading, but they’ve got a clean bill of health.”

All stalls at the markets were inspected on Friday.

Lucky’s Taproom patrons aren’t so lucky; foodborne illnesses linked to Dayton restaurant

Today I talked to a restaurant operator about something they wanted to do that was risky. After talking about what could go wrong, the operator said ‘I don’t want to make people sick, I’ll figure something else out.’

Making patrons sick is bad business.6980

According to WHIO, a Dayton restaurant has closed as health officials investigate the source of illnesses.

The health department received the first report of Lucky’s patrons and employees being ill on Monday and samples have been sent to the Ohio Department of Health for testing, said Health Commissioner Jeff Cooper.

The testing will identify what specifically the people are suffering from, Cooper said.
Cooper said they are currently still collecting samples and conducting interviews, in part to determine whether there was a particular food or dish that all the sick people ate.

Drew Trick, owner of Lucky’s, confirmed this afternoon that the restaurant and bar voluntarily shut down at least through Friday while health officials test produce and other items to try to determine what caused the food-borne illness that affected both customers and employees.

“We’re doing everything we can to ensure our customers are safe when we reopen,” Trick said.

“We have bleached every square inch of this establishment” and have thrown out all produce and other food items to ensure the threat is eliminated, the restaurant’s owner said.

I wonder if some of those sick employees were working while ill.

Food is getting safer, but still might make you sick

Scott Canon of The Kansas City Star writes in a good food safety feature, go ahead and eat out. Or eat in (edited excerpts below).

produceWhether you dig into Mom’s casserole, feast on the local diner’s daily special or snarf up something from a mega-corporation’s drive-through, America’s meals may arrive as safe now as mankind has ever known.

Just not 100 percent.

Government rules continue to tighten. Various industries, fearful of lawsuits and the lost business that follows bad publicity, put more muscle into keeping things clean.

Yet experts also describe an increasingly elaborate system that tests the power to keep a meal safe.

“The marketplace is probably more complex,” said Charles Hunt, the Kansas state epidemiologist. “The produce that you get in the store today was in Mexico or someplace else just a few days before.”

The Chipotle chain saw multiple, high-profile problems last year. An E. coli outbreak traced to its restaurants in October. In December, the company also was tied to a norovirus incident in Boston, following outbreaks of the pathogen earlier in the year at outlets in California and Minnesota.

In the Kansas City area, more than 600 people got sick after attending shows at the New Theater Restaurant in January, and tests confirmed infections of the norovirus in at least some. It also struck at least 18 staff and patients at the University of Kansas Hospital’s Marillac Campus that month. And about a dozen people were hit with the same vomiting and diarrhea shortly afterward at a Buffalo Wild Wings in Overland Park.

Upticks in detections of outbreaks of food-borne illness, analysts say, likely reflect our increasing powers to spot them — not a growing danger.

In 1998, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration traced an outbreak of salmonella agona to a Malt-O-Meal processing plant in Minnesota. Ten years later, the same plant again shipped out cereal tainted with salmonella, sickening at least 33 people.

With the two incidents separated by a decade, any link seemed coincidental.

But a few years later, the FDA built a powerful tool for analyzing bacterial strains — Whole Genome Sequencing. It can identify down the lineage of any bacterium in its database. In this case it showed the new salmonella was the direct descendant of the earlier one.

barfblog.Stick It InIt turned out that the first outbreak stemmed from contaminated water used to clean the plant during a renovation. That same water was mixed in with mortar for the construction. Dangerous salmonella had been preserved in that mortar. Over the years, the surface of the mortar turned to dust, got wet and gave new life to that distinct family of salmonella.

Imagine the implications. The plant could prevent repeats by painting a sealant over the unlikely culprit — mortar in its walls.

But think of the child who becomes sick down the road with salmonella. The source could be any of thousands of ingredients consumed by an American kid in a normal day. But what if a doctor shares the salmonella sample with federal disease trackers? By looking at the particular genetic line, scientists can spot the family tree and the likely source.

“It tells you who’s related to who even over many years,” said Eric Brown, the director of the Division of Microbiology at the FDA’s Center for Food Safety & Applied Nutrition.

Technology, food safety experts say, only goes so far.

The bigger payoffs come from diligence. That means, foremost, avoiding contamination from feces.

“Our food safety starts on the farm,” said Doug Powell. A former Kansas State University professor of food safety, he’s now the chief author of barfblog.

“It has to be systemic, repeated and relevant.”

For starters, farmers should not use manure on fresh produce. They need to know where their irrigation supply comes from and whether runoff during heavy rains travels from feedlots or other places where livestock or farm workers defecate. Washing those fruits and vegetables later down the line is necessary, but that often can’t overcome massive exposure to E. coli and other potentially fatal bacteria that thrive in poop.

Bill Marler, a Seattle attorney who’s made a high-profile career filing lawsuits in food-borne illness cases, speaks with less alarm about the direction of Big Meat.

After years of restaurants and meat packers weathering expensive lawsuits and public relations disasters, he said, they’ve changed.

Take the slaughterhouse. Cattle arrive splattered with barnyard waste. For years, that created problems because the tainted hides would inevitably taint the skinned carcasses. But now, packing operations routinely steam-clean or treat the carcasses with an acid wash.

“You started to see an amazing turnaround and recalls linked to hamburger have fallen like a stone,” Marler said.

Meantime, he said, restaurants better recognize the business risk of not killing pathogens that cling to meat. Marler said big chains, in particular, devote increasing effort to thoroughly cooking beef, pork and poultry.

And federal rules on the required temperature for cooked meat have increased. Some chains, such as Taco Bell, now cook meat at centralized locations before shipping it to franchises. The local teenager preparing that food for customers still needs to be wary of temperature control, but much of the responsibility for safety has been standardized by corporate operations.

Produce, he and others say, poses a more difficult problem. Food that’s not cooked lacks the critical “kill step” to render harmless the bacteria that do slip through.

That, goes the critique, sets up a corporate culture that valued freshness over safety.

The company has responded by shutting down its restaurants repeatedly for special training days and saying its redoubled efforts to track the practices of its suppliers.

(Many have noted that much of Chipotle’s problems related to contamination from sick workers, not from its pursuit of freshness. More on that later.)

food-handler-card-skillsBut consumers have shown an increasing interest in the source of their food, preferring fresh over processed and local or organic over cheaper commodity ingredients. That’s tied, analysts say, to the belief that food made on a smaller scale and without the use of antibiotics in livestock or pesticides in crops is safer.

Some evidence suggests that such methods provide a more nutritious meal that may avoid long-term health risks. Yet they can pose new challenges in dodging food-borne pathogens in the short term, said barfblog’s Powell and others.

“Natural, organic, sustainable, dolphin-free — those are lifestyle choices,” Powell said. “There’s been no study that has conclusively said one way or another if it’s more likely to make you barf more.”

He worries it might. Smaller farms might not have the resources, or the sophistication, to keep soiled rain runoff from their vegetable patches. The farmer’s market customers or restaurants drawn to their farm-to-plate marketing, he said, might be less inclined to question safety.

“McDonald’s has it covered,” Powell said. “At the boutique places, I say I want my meat cooked to 165 degrees and they look at me like I just came off the turnip truck.”

 

54 sick: Salmonella in lettuce spreads in Australia

This is how bad public reporting of foodborne illness is in Australia.

lettuce.skull.noroRetailers, even with crappy Internet, we have cameras, and you’ll be found out.

An increasing number of Queenslanders claim they’ve been made ill from supermarket-bought salads in the wake of salmonella outbreak, but Woolworths and Coles insist there’s no problem with Queensland supply.

“The supplier in question does not supply into Queensland so there is no need to worry,” a Woolworths spokesman told The Courier-Mail.

While a Cole statement confirmed: “None of the recalled products are sold in Queensland, there is no cause for concern.”

It is believed Coles and Woolworths have stopped taking supplies from Tripod indefinitely.

Chelsea Bienke is just one of Queensland consumers who believe a bout of extreme vomiting and diarrhea was sparked after eating Woolworths lettuce.

The Brisbane woman and her sister were extremely ill for days after eating a meal with mixed salad.

“We had diarrhea for days and I was vomiting” Ms Bienke said.

“I felt like complete crap. I couldn’t go to work this week.”

She said she doubted claims that the product wouldn’t affect any customers.

“Well it’s strange how we bought the product last week and by Tuesday we were vomiting and had diarrhea,” Ms Bienke said.

“My niece who doesn’t eat the product is perfectly fine.”

Another Queenslander wrote on Coles’ Facebook page: “Are you sure Qld products are not affected. I bought spinach and rocket mix. My child has been unwell for three days.”

Another Brisbane mum posted on the same page: “You say Qld isn’t affected but my kids have been sick with headache and nausea. We eat your salads all the time and five of my six kids have been sick.