Evaluation? E. coli victims appeal to workers in LGMA training video

Coral Beach of The Packer writes that victims of the 2006 E. coli outbreak linked to fresh spinach tell their stories in a new food safety training video co-produaced by the California Leafy Greens Marketing Agreement and the non-profit group STOP Foodborne Illness.

Lauren Bush tells her story in the video, describing how as a 20-year-old college student she contracted an infection from a spinach salad that ultimately sent her to the hospital with hemorrhaging and other severe symptoms.

“I’m so pleased with the video,” Bush said during a Nov. 19 Internet press conference. “I hope it reminds everyone who sees it of the importance of what they are doing. I know it must be a lot of extra work, but it does save lives.”

Dan Sutton, LGMA member and general manager of Pismo Oceano Vegetable Exchange, said he attended a training session a week before the press conference and watched the reactions of people seeing it for the first time.

“There was absolute silence when it was over,” Sutton said. “It had an impact.”

The video is bilingual with segments presented in Spanish and English.

Investigation of E. coli outbreak at Oregon Montessori school closed and remains a mystery

The E. coli outbreak at a West Linn Montessori school that sickened three children will remain a mystery, with health officials announcing Monday they have wrapped up the investigation without evidence pointing to the cause.

West-Linn-MontessoriInvestigators combed Heart Centered Montessori School, taking environmental samples that were tested for E. coli. All students and staff were tested as well. Those tests yielded nothing, according a news release.

Son recalls how eating raw cookie dough led to one mom’s death

His mother died an agonizing death, possibly because she ate a few bites of raw cookie dough years earlier.

nestle.toll.house.cookie.doughRichard Simpson, of Las Vegas, recounted his mom’s painful battle with E. coli today at an FDA hearing about stricter regulations on food production.

Linda Rivera died last summer, four years after she ate a few spoonfuls of prepackaged cookie dough that was later found to be contaminated with a dangerous strain of E. coli. First, her kidneys stopped functioning and she went into septic shock. Over the years, she became sicker as more organs failed and she was in and out of the hospital for operations.

“There were moments of hope — and of despair,” Simpson, 22, said today. “She fought very hard. We knew she didn’t want to give up.”

Rivera died in July 2013 from medical complications that appeared to stem from the E. coli she was infected with years earlier, her son said.

“Eventually, her body just couldn’t take it,” said Bill Marler, Rivera’s friend and the attorney who handled her claim against Nestle, which manufactured the contaminated cookie dough in 2009.

“She was probably the most severely injured E. coli victim I have ever seen,” he added. “She suffered brain injury. She had quite a large section of her large intestines removed. She suffered so many infections while hospitalized it was incredible. She was on a ventilator for several months in a coma. She was a very sick lady.”

Through it all, Rivera’s family and Marler said, she remained strong.

“I remember the first time I met Linda, she was vomiting and retching and she was really sick, but she would apologize — ‘I am so sorry, please sit down, do you need anything to drink?’” Marler said. “That’s just the way she was. She was just the most graceful, caring person you can ever meet.”

Simpson, who recently got married, said he’s fighting for stricter food regulations so another son doesn’t have to testify about his mother’s eventual death after she ate contaminated food.

Nestle recalled its pre-made Toll House cookie dough in 2009 after dozens of E. coli illnesses were reported.

Rivera’s claim against the company was settled for an undisclosed amount, Marler said.

In a statement, Nestle said, “The fact that our product was implicated in Linda Rivera’s 2009 illness and tragic passing was obviously of grave concern to all of us at Nestle. Since then, we have implemented more stringent testing and inspection of raw materials and finished product to ensure the product meets our high quality standards. In addition, we have switched to using heat-treated flour to further enhance safety. We continue to emphasize that the cookie dough should be consumed only after baking and not eaten raw.”

‘E. coli festering in the microwave’ surprise for four beer and chips-loving Irish students

Conor, Padraig, Brian and Paddy are students at Athlone Institute of Technology, and have been supplementing their studies with a diet of beer and chips while dangerous E. coli festers in their microwave.

Doctor+in+the+House+-+Ep5+(1)The lads, all in their 20s, are blissfully unaware of the dangers of their diet and lifestyle, and the consequences of coming into contact with E. coli.

The doctors, including Dr. Nina Byrnes, Dr. Sinead Beirne and Professor Niall Moyna, learn that Conor has a family history of heart problems and is concerned for his own cardiac health.

Brian is addicted to sugar and video games, Padraig is a man who seems to be a little too fond of his pints, and Paddy is the healthiest in this not so healthy student house.

Apart from their dodgy diet, Dr. Nina Byrnes encounters something a little more disturbing.  She finds E. coli growing in their much-loved microwave and sends the swab to the lab.

“It grew a very heavy growth of bacteria called E. coli,” she says.

“At the very severe end of E. coli, there’s a particular strain of E. coli that can cause kidney failure and death and that was growing in your microwave.

Terrified by the revelation the lads are quick to sign up to an eight week exercise programme and lifestyle overhaul.  But can they ditch their beer-swilling and chip-ingesting ways?

Doctor in the House episode 5 airs Monday 10th November at 9pm on TV3.

But it’s trendy: 5 kids sick in UK linked to raw milk

The food watchdog has issued a warning about the dangers of giving unpasteurised milk to children after five youngsters were taken to hospital with E.coli poisoning.

colbert.raw.milkThe unpasteurised milk has become trendy among celebrity food writers and other advocates of unprocessed ‘raw food,’ who claim it is both tastier and healthier.

However, consumers are putting themselves at risk because the milk is not heat treated to remove dangerous bugs.

The UK Food Standards Agency said there have been incidents on three farms selling raw milk in recent weeks which led to E. coli poisoning in five children aged one to 12 and one adult aged 28.

The watchdog has now suspended sales of raw cows’ drinking milk and any product made from the milk, including cheese, at all three farms.

In a resounding show of statistical idiocy, Shane Holland, of campaigning group Slow Food UK, said: ‘Data from the US show that raw milk is many thousands of times less likely to give you food poisoning than other commonly eaten foods not deemed “risky” by the FSA.’

No.

Another supporter of raw milk is food writer Tom Parker Bowles who has described it as ‘rich, bounteous and fulsome.’

No.

Familiar with strict liability? Schnucks sued over E. coli outbreak

A woman from St. Charles County is seeking damages from Schnucks and three companies in its supply chain after suffering kidney failure and long-term health problems from an E. coli bacterial infection linked to romaine lettuce sold at the Arsenal Street store in St. Louis, according to a lawsuit filed Tuesday in St. Louis circuit court.

lettuce.skull.e.coli.O145The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that Romaine lettuce from salad bars at nine Schnucks locations was the most common denominator in an E. coli outbreak in the fall of 2011 that sickened 60 people in 10 states. The contamination probably occurred at a farm before the lettuce reached the stores, according to a federal health investigation.

The plaintiff, Lisa Bryant, spent a week in the hospital and required blood transfusions while being treated for the illness after eating the lettuce in October 2011. She has accrued more than $85,000 in medical bills, according to her attorney, Bill Marler of Seattle.

About a dozen lawsuits related to the outbreak have been filed against Schnucks. Lori Willis, a spokeswoman for Schnucks, said, “It is our position that Schnucks holds no liability on this matter, and we intend to aggressively defend that position in court.”

85 sick in UK shiga-toxin producing E. coli outbreak; source unknown

So far 75 people have been affected (primary cases): 67 in England, 3 in Wales and 5 in Scotland. Genetic analysis has shown that all these individuals have all been infected with the same E.coli strain. Most of these cases are adults but the total number of cases has an age range of between 2 to 90. Twenty-seven males and 48 (64%) females have been affected.

e.coli.magnifiedIn addition, there have also been 10 secondary cases reported. These are people who have become unwell through contact with a primary case.

Further details are available on 82 of the total cases all of whom reported symptoms of diarrhoea. Bloody diarrhoea was reported by 58 people (71%) and 25 people have been hospitalised as a result of their illness. There have been no deaths or cases of haemolytic-uraemic syndrome which is a serious complication of an E. coli infection which can result in kidney failure.

At present there is no clear indication as to what is causing the outbreak. 

One child dead, 2 sick from E. coli in Oregon E. coli; parents desperate for answers ask was it a goat named Cathy?

The parents of a Lincoln County girl, Serena Profitt, who died last month of shiga-toxin producing E. coli, say public health officials suspect the 4-year-old was infected by droppings from the family’s goat.

goat.poop.oct.14But Rachel Profitt told The Oregonian lab tests have not been conclusive and the investigation continues into the death of her daughter Serena.

Proffit says Lincoln County health officials advised the family to euthanize the goat, a family pet named Cathy. They are reluctant. It’s now corralled away from people.

A 5-year-old boy and a 3-year-old girl from surroundings areas have also been infected and developed hemolytic uremic syndrome.

Health officials say they’re still investigating the cause of the three kids’ E. coli infections.

‘Safest food in the world E. coli in sprouts; just want to be misunderstood

Just days before his sister’s wedding, Alumnus Wilson Criscione was lying on a hospital bed, his body seemingly withering away and his arm impaled by an IV needle.

santa.barf.sprout.raw.milk“I didn’t really think it was food poisoning,” Criscione  told of Aaron Bocook of The Eastener in Washington State.

E. coli was eventually traced back to Evergreen Sprouts LLC of Moyie Springs, Idaho, who ships their product to both Pita Pit and Jimmy John’s, two places where he ate in the days leading up to his food poisoning. According to Criscione’s lawyer, Evergreen has been involved in lawsuits over food poisoning in the past, including a suit over salmonella in 2010. – See more at: http://easterneronline.com/33975/news/foodborne-illnesses-misunderstood/#sthash.2KTH3ifi.dpuf. “With food poisoning, you would think you’d be throwing up a lot, but I didn’t throw up once.”

He said he thought he had mild food poisoning earlier in the year: he threw up a few times, but was only sick for about one day.

“This was different,” he said.

After feeling sick to his stomach, Criscione said he started seeing blood coming from places it should not.

He went to the emergency room, where he was tested and given pain killers for severe abdominal cramping. “It felt like someone was strangling my stomach,” he said.

After a total of four days and three nights in the hospital, he lost 15 pounds. Along with a nearly $5,000 bill, he was given his diagnosis. Food poisoning from a rare strain of E. coli bacteria.

Dave McKay, Eastern’s director of Dining Services, said most people do not realize just how serious food borne illness can be, and it is his job to address any claims that these illnesses could be linked to an on-campus food supply.

“As the American public, our mothers taught us, ‘Was it something you ate?’” McKay said. “The truth is though, we have the safest food supply in the world in the United States. Just for Eastern, for our standards, and what we monitor, we have had in the last five years, over 5 million sales or transactions through our operations. We have not one confirmed case of food poisoning.”

Didn’t happen yesterday so  probably won’t happen tomorrow.

5 sickened: kids’ E. coli came from raw milk, Kentucky says

Five children sickened by E. coli infections last month drank unpasteurized milk, an investigation has found.

colbert.raw.milkThe state Department for Public Health worked with local health departments, hospitals and health care providers to find the cause of the outbreak, which affected children in Hardin, Oldham and Boone counties.

Four of the five children developed hemolytic uremic syndrome.

Dr. Stephanie Mayfield, commissioner of the state health department. “Unpasteurized milk is dangerous and has not undergone a process to kill bacteria before it is consumed …  raw milk, no matter how carefully it is produced, may contain pathogens.”