Family graduation party in Michigan sickens six

A graduation party in the Sturgis area is suspected of being the source of foodborne illness last weekend that affected six people.

diploma-cookiesAccording to Steve Andriaachi, environmental health officer for Branch-Hillsdale-St. Joseph Community Health Agency, a member of the family with food service background catered the party. There has been no laboratory report completed yet regarding what caused the illness. Andriaachi said it is too early to release any details about the investigation.

UK grandmother dies after carvery meal: Investigation underway

A woman who ate a carvery dinner before she jetted off on holiday has died of suspected food poisoning two weeks after a pub visit.

julie.hemmingsGrandmother-of-four Julie Hemmings, 53, tucked in to a carvery meal in a London pub with her husband Mark, 55, brother-in-law Nick Kyriacou, and his wife Trish before the couple flew to Turkey.

But when the pair arrived at the resort the next day, Mrs Hemmings started spewing up ‘red’ vomit and died two weeks later after her condition worsened.

Doctors told her devastated husband that the poison was ‘seeping through her body’ after her bowel had perforated.

An investigation is now under way into the food poisoning claim after the couple and Mr Kyriacou all fell ill with sickness and diarrhea following their meal out.

A Merton Council spokesperson said: ‘Merton Council’s Environmental Health team are carrying out an investigation.

Algorithms for Salmonella surveillance

The objective of this study was to assess the use of statistical algorithms in identifying significant clusters of Salmonella spp. across different sectors of the food chain within an integrated surveillance programme.

Three years of weekly Salmonella serotype data from farm animals, meat, and humans were used to create baseline models (first two years) and identify weeks with counts higher than expected using surveillance algorithms in the third (test) year.

During the test year, an expert working group identified events of interest reviewing descriptive analyses of same data. The algorithms did not identify Salmonella events presenting as gradual increases or seasonal patterns as identified by the working group.

However, the algorithms did identify clusters for further investigation, suggesting they could be a valuable complementary tool within an integrated surveillance system.

Utility of algorithms for the analysis of integrated Salmonella surveillance data

Epidemiology and Infection, Volume 144, Issue 10, July 2016, pp. 2165-2175, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0950268816000182

Vrbova, D.M. Patrick, C. Stephen, C. Roberston, M. Koehoorn, E.J. Parmley, N.I. De With, E. Galanis

http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=10375411&utm_source=Issue_Alert&utm_medium=RSS&utm_campaign=HYG

Phages used to reduce Salmonella by 90 percent in meat products

Assistant Professor Amilton de Mello, from the College of Agriculture, Biotechnology and Natural Resources at the University of Nevada, Reno, presented his research at the international American Meat Science Association’s conference June 20-22 in Texas.

Amilton de Mello“We were able to reduce salmonella by as much as 90 percent in ground poultry, ground pork and ground beef,” de Mello reported. “We’re excited to be able to show such good results, food safety is an important part of our work and salmonella is one of the most prevalent bacteria in the nation’s food supply.”

De Mello’s research treated meat products infected with four types of salmonella by applying Myoviridae bacteriophages during mixing. Bacteriophages are commonly found in our environment. They are viruses that can only harm specific bacterial cells and are harmless to humans, animals and plants.

In the experiments, the salmonella bacteria was inoculated on refrigerated meat and poultry trim, then the treatment was applied to the meat before grinding. The bacteriophages invaded the cells of the bacteria and destroyed them.

“On the final ground meat products, there was a 10-fold decrease of salmonella,” de Mello said. “The results are very encouraging and we’re hoping this can be adopted by the meat industry to increase food safety.”

Man throws poop in Ohio courtroom after receiving 40-year prison sentence

Suzannah Weiss of Complex writes a 46-year-old Ohio resident, Ricky Hand, threw feces and urine through the courtroom after being sentenced to 40 years for multiple armed robberies, he, according to WWLP.

poop.gif“Did you just give me 40 years, sir? You just gave me 40 years. Well guess what?” Hand said to the judge before taking bottles full of poop and pee out of his arm sling and flinging the contents into the air. Court officials had to restrain him.

How on Earth did he manage to sneak that in there, though?

Clark County Sheriff Gene Kelly told Complex that Hand was shot after his latest robbery and was fed the health drink Ensure in jail to help him recover. “He was drinking the Ensure and then putting his feces and urine in the bottles and putting the lids on and hoarding them,” Kelly said. “He had concealed them on his person as he went to court for his sentencing.”

Kelly added: “Deputies are under investigation for not following our procedures, and if they would’ve done that, this would’ve never happened. The deputies who failed to follow procedure are not going to find this very funny.”

UK goes with Food Crime Confidential

The UK Food Standards Agency’s National Food Crime Unit has launched Food Crime Confidential. This is a reporting facility where anyone with suspicions about food crime can report them safely and in confidence, over the phone or through email. The facility is particularly targeted at those working in or around the UK food industry.

food.crime.confidentialThe FSA’s National Food Crime Unit (NFCU) works with partners to protect people from serious criminal activity that impacts the safety or authenticity of food and drink they consume.

Food crime involves dishonesty at any stage in the production or supply of food. It is often complex and likely to be seriously detrimental to consumers, businesses or the general public interest.

NFCU would like to receive any information relating to suspected dishonesty involving food, drink or animal feed. In addition to identifying and being able to tackle specific instances of food crime, such information will help us learn more about the circumstances that make offending possible.

The National Food Crime Unit would like to hear from anyone if they have suspicions including:

that food or drink contains things which it shouldn’t

that methods used in your workplace for producing, processing, storing, labelling or transporting food do not seem quite right

that an item of food or drink says it is of a certain quality or from a specific place or region, but it doesn’t appear to be.

Call 0207 276 8787 or email foodcrime@foodstandards.gsi.gov.uk

Head of Food Crime at the FSA, Andy Morling said: ‘The National Food Crime Unit is committed to putting consumers first in everything we do. That is why we are launching Food Crime Confidential today to ensure that those with information about food crime can report it in confidence. The facility is open to anyone who has information about food which is being dishonestly produced, manufactured or sold.

‘We particularly want to hear from those who work in or around the UK food industry. We recognise that picking up the phone to pass on suspicions about an employer or an associate can be a big deal. That’s why we’ll ensure the information provided will be handled sensitively and professionally.’

 

Food fraud: Ireland wants to separate its cheese from Brits

Provenance of processed foods is a significant quality attribute for many consumers and one for which they are willing to pay a price premium. As a consequence, the fraudulent mislabeling or adulteration of high-value foods now occurs on a global scale.

Artisan_cheese_cover_200Regulatory authorities and food businesses are focusing greater efforts in combating food fraud which can have serious ramifications for both revenue and reputation.

A number of provenance verification schemes have been established in other countries with the express purpose of protecting the denomination of quality associated with particular food products. This includes the Grana Padano or Parmigiano-Reggiano protected designation of origin status for artisan cheeses in Italy. There is currently no such scheme for artisan or “farmhouse” cheeses produced on the island of Ireland and yet it is desirable to facilitate a system of provenance confirmation which can provide confidence to consumers in the true geographical origin of artisan cheeses branded as produced on the island of Ireland. It is therefore prudent at this point in time to investigate analytical methods that could be applied to provide consumers with the necessary assurance of the claimed island of Ireland origin of such products.

The concentration and relative ratios of key analytes in a food products such as cheese are mainly influenced by animal diet and geographic location. Several reports from other countries or regions have shown that the use of multivariate analysis of analytical data comprising elemental and isotopic ratio values can provide confirmation of claimed geographic provenance. Given that food animals on the island of Ireland are largely fed a grass-based diet and reside within a discrete insular geographical area, there is potential for developing robust fingerprint models that can characterise indigenous farmhouse cheeses.

Ultimately, the development of robust models will require the demonstration of two properties: (a) models should correctly classify the provenance of all island of Ireland-produced artisan cheeses as originating on the island of Ireland, and (b) models should correctly identify that farmhouse cheeses produced outside the island of Ireland are not of island of Ireland provenance. These two objectives are inseparable in the context of the provenance testing desired and must be demonstrated before any such model can be confidently used in practice. Before this juncture is reached the application of analytical methodologies for the purposes of robust fingerprinting must be investigated.

Artisan_cheese_640_90This project was a technology viability study that set out to do just that. The strategy pursued generated a considerable quantity of baseline analytical data on the elemental and isotopic composition of island of Ireland artisanal cheese as well as a selection of artisanal cheeses from Great Britain and mainland Europe. While it was not possible to confirm the geographic provenance of island of Ireland artisanal cheeses with 100% accuracy, nonetheless trends in some of the data, especially the isotope data, suggest the possibility of effective segregation of island of Ireland from mainland European, if not Great Britain, cheeses.

Therefore the analytical methodologies investigated have been scoped out for this purpose and can now be taken forward and applied in more focused investigations involving artisan cheeses and other foods produced on the island of Ireland.

Cleveland fan eats horse poop during NBA championship parade

The Cleveland Cavaliers and 1.3 million of their fans celebrated the franchise’s first National Basketball Association championship on Wednesday as their victory parade and rally took over the downtown area.

In video clip below, courtesy of Barstool Sports, one fan in attendance decided to make a spectacle of himself by pushing other parade goers out of the way in order to rush over to what appears to be a fresh batch of horse manure and proceeding to eat it in front of the crowd around him.

What the hell Cleveland?

 

Australia: Almost 200 children home sick from Adelaide school

Some classes at Modbury West Primary School, which has 420 enrolments, had less than 10 students in attendance Friday.

Modbury West Primary SchoolPrincipal Deb Hancock told Advertiser.com.au the school sent a text message to parents on Thursday informing them many children had been unwell.

The text message also asked parents to keep children at home if they felt sick.

Ms Hancock said a dozen students were sent home on Thursday on the same day there were 80 children absent from class, after they showed gastro symptoms.

1 dead, 38 sick at Greece baptism party: Maybe it was the feta

One person is dead and two are in critical condition amongst the 38 people who suffered food poisoning after a baptism party in Aspra Spitia, Viotia, in central Greece.

buffet food

buffet food

The baptism party was held on Saturday and afterwards 38 people were transferred to the hospital with severe gastroenteritis symptoms. Health experts claim it was salmonella that caused the mass food poisoning.

According to local website lamiareport.gr, a 55-year-old man died in the hospital while two others are in intensive care. The 23-year-old son of the man was transferred to an Athens hospital for treatment, while another guest is in intensive care at a Lamia hospital.

A guest who spoke to lamia.gr believes the salmonella was in a specific feta cheese because all the people who ate it ended up in the hospital, while those who didn’t eat the particular cheese showed no gastroenteritis symptoms whatsoever.