it’s the poop

I was wearing one of our 2006 don’t eat poop T-shirts today as I walked Sorenne to school with Ted the wonderdog.

Most families noticed Ted, but one parent said, “sage advice.”

Clearly someone I could chat with.

He knew all the Australian outbreaks, and said he was in California when spinach happened in 2006, so was a good chat.

But maybe we talk about poop too much. From our artistic (and spelling-challenged) daughter:

Strunk and White never goes out of style

For the thousands of students I have had the privilege of teaching over the past three decades, a reminder: read Strunk and White, and know it inside out.

For assignments, I always gave 60% for content, 40% for style.

So learn to fucking spell and write in coherent sentences, or stop wasting my — or anyone else’s — time.

I miss you: But barfblog needs to stop living in my basement

Hated the song, Miss You, when it came out on Some Girls, the go-to Stones album of my high-school yout in 1978, but saw them live in Buffalo in 1981 and they rocked it up and I sorta got it.

Respcectable is much better from Some Girls.

Journey still sucks.

barfblog.com will be back, but a little different.

No longer tied to any sponsorship, academic or anyone.

(Chapman is, but he needs his job; I don’t).

I’m Canadian. Get used to the fucking swearing or get the fuck off.

A few years ago at the International Association for Food Protection annual meeting, I told the audience, after revealing my wife’s breast size because she asked me to shop for bras – which I did — that the audience of food safety geeks now knew more about my wife’s breast size than they knew about the food they were about to eat for dinner, where it came from, and how it was prepared.

A government-type said she couldn’t read me anymore.

Then don’t.


Or the way 1.5 million attended my farewell blog.

But a few thousand have written in so:

After 25 years of food safety risk communication, nothing has changed.

A self-congratulating-largely-taxpayer-funded crowd to tell people food safety is their fault is not a movement.

Cut-and-paste press releases do not make a publication, regardless of medium – and I’ll take on anyone who wants to talk the medium is the message by University of Toronto prof Marshall McLuhan.

I miss you probably not in the same way Jamie Oliver misses his parents, who own The Cricketers Pub in Essex, England, and was downgraded from the highest rating of 5 to 2 for poor hygiene after inspectors found dead uncooked pheasants next to pre-cooked potato chips, frozen chicken that expired three months ago, and dirt and grease through tout the kitchen.

Then there’s the academics, going on about food safety culture, about eight-years after it jumped the shark.

I’ll let the abstract speak for itself:

In an intensifying climate of scrutiny over food safety, the food industry is turning to “food safety culture” as a one-size-fits-all solution to protect both consumers and companies. This strategy focuses on changing employee behavior from farm to fork to fit a universal model of bureaucratic control; the goal is system-wide cultural transformation in the name of combatting foodborne illness. Through grounded fieldwork centered on the case of a regional wholesale produce market in California, we examine the consequences of this bureaucratization of food safety power on the everyday routines and lived experiences of people working to grow, pack, and deliver fresh produce. We find that despite rhetoric promising a rational and universal answer to food safety, fear and frustration over pervasive uncertainty and legal threats can produce cynicism, distrust, and fragmentation among agrifood actors. Furthermore, under the cover of its public health mission to prevent foodborne illness, food safety culture exerts a new moral economy that sorts companies and employees into categories of ‘good’ and ‘bad’ according to an abstracted calculation of ‘riskiness’ along a scale from safe to dangerous. We raise the concern that ‘safety’ is usurping other deeply held values and excluding cultural forms and experiential knowledges associated with long-standing food-ways. The long-term danger, we conclude, is that this uniform and myopic response to real risks of foodborne illness will not lead to a holistically healthy or sustainable agrifood system, but rather perpetuate a spiralling cycle of crisis and reform that carries a very real human toll.

Oh Fonz.

 

7-minute abs, not 6: Shortest bullshit workout possible

Gretchen Reynolds of the NY Times writes that super-short workouts are a favorite topic in this column. I have written about seven-minute, six-minute, four-minute, and even one-minute workouts. They are appealing because they require so little time, but they also demand straining effort.

Martin Gibala is the scientist we most have to thank for the popularity of very brief, very hard exercise. All of these workouts are built around the concept of high-intensity interval training, in which you push yourself almost to exhaustion for a brief spurt of minutes or seconds, and then rest and recover for a few minutes before repeating the intense interval.

Athletes have long used interval sessions as part of a varied weekly training program to improve their competitiveness. But Dr. Gibala, a professor of kinesiology at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario, has helped to popularize the idea that we can rely on high-intensity intervals as our only exercise, and do very, very few of them while still improving our health and fitness.

Since 2004, he has published multiple studies about the potent effects of intervals.

But McMaster? Shithole Hamilton?

Going public: A reader complains

Donald Trump is the Sid Vicious of Presidents. Can barely play the bass, all show, will probably OD.

I’ve kept a low profile and will continue, but when someone responds to a blog post about USDA food safety scientists being muzzled, and says I should stick to food safety, I will use my pulpit to say something.

We have a paper that has been years in the making, has been peer-reviewed, accepted and will be published in April, that talks all about going pubic.

But I’m not about to break my ban on press release before publication.

Pete Townsend’s Rough Boys was his response to Sid, The Sex Pistols and punk. Neil Young’s Into the Black was his response.

Punk went nowhere. Rock will last.

If you can’t see the link between popular culture, and the kid making minimum wage serving your lunch, then you must really believe in faith-based food safety. Praise the Lord and pass the guacamole — or ammo.

Saw Neil on this tour in 1991 in Toronto.

Took Chapman to a Neil concert in the 2000s. It’s what responsible graduate student advisors do.

dp


You should probably stick to writing about Food Safety.

On Tue, Jan 24, 2017 at 7:16 PM Doug Powell <dpowell29@gmail.com> wrote:

Summary:

For the many who have asked, barfblog.com is on hiatus while I chill and focus on other things.

But some things deserve a wide audience.

Buzzfeed reports the U.S. Department of Agriculture has banned scientists and other employees in its main research division from publicly sharing everything from the summaries of scientific papers to USDA-branded tweets as …

View the entire entry:

http://barfblog.com/2017/01/the-chill-started-in-kansas-i-live-in-australia-usda-scientists-have-been-put-on-lockdown-under-trump/

==============================================

Unsubscribe jharris58@gmail.com from this list:

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Melt the Ice: Because it’s 32C and we’re playing hockey

School holidays, the equivalent of summer holidays for our friends in the Northern Hemisphere, end Monday and the kids go back to school.

bec-doug-mti-hockey-jan-17The four days before the end of summer holidays are devoted to the Melt-the-Ice tournament in neighbouring Boondall.

We were there for 6 a.m.today, and came home with a win and a loss. More games over the weekend.

This is assistant coach Bec and I going over strategies before the second game while the players waited to get on the ice. That’s Sorenne on the far right (Bec was showing me pictures of her newly almost completed deck; photo credit to assistant coach Zoe).

Go Stars.

 

Safety? Food on iPads

Olee Fowler of Eater reports a restaurant in New York City is employing Apple Watches to increase communication between staff; tablets on tables are replacing menus and servers at restaurants across the country; and apps are aiming to smooth out everything from ordering to payment to food delivery. Serving actual food on an actual iPad may be the next big thing in dining rooms across the globe.

food-ipadRestaurants in the United Kingdom have been using iPads as plates since 2015, according to the Daily Mail. Arzak, the San Sebastian restaurant that boasts three Michelin stars, has been serving food on iPads for a few years. Now, acclaimed San Francisco restaurant Quince is the latest to join the trend.

The 13-year-old, tasting-menu-only spot run by Michael and Lindsey Tusk, which just received its third Michelin star this year, is now incorporating iPads into its meals: The dish “A Dog in Search of Gold” is served on a iPad Pro in lieu of a plate. Understandably, this had some on Twitter scratching their heads a few days ago when it was first revealed. According to 9to5Mac, it’s an attempt by the restaurant to attract a younger audience.

The dish, which is made of white truffle croquettes on iPads playing videos of dogs on the truffle-hunt, raises questions about food safety and how thoroughly the iPads are cleaned in-between customers, which is something San Francisco has no regulations on at the moment.

Representatives for Quince did not respond to requests for comment.

‘Stay off that whiskey and let that cocaine be’ Police smash cocaine ring at Sydney Fish Market in Christmas Day raid

A former rugby league first grade player, a Bondi entrepreneur and a maritime worker are among 15 men arrested on Christmas Day in a multimillion-dollar cocaine ring bust.

sydney-cocaine-fishPolice will allege the men were importing cocaine via the iconic Sydney Fish Market and other NSW ports.

It’s alleged they used a shipping vessel named Dalrymple to ferry drugs between NSW ports and a larger ship stationed out at sea that held drugs smuggled from Chile.

About 500 kilograms of cocaine was seized from a dinghy at Brooklyn on the NSW Central Coast.

Several of the men were arrested on board the Dalrymple vessel as it docked at Sydney Fish Market on Christmas night.

The operation by NSW Police, Australian Federal Police and Australian Border Force has been running for more than two-and-a-half years.

Police say they have seized 500 kilograms of cocaine and more than 600 kilograms of the same drug in Tahiti which they will allege was destined for Australia.

Authorities valued the total amount of cocaine seized at $360 million.