Australia: stolen cattle gallstones and upsetting sheep with foul language

Australia can be a weird place.

johnny_depp_71911A collection of cattle gallstones, which are used in Chinese herbal medicine at $20,000 per kilogram, began disappearing over the last six months from a slaughterhouse at Oakey, west of Toowoomba.

The Toowoomba Stock and Rural Crime Investigation Squad this week raided a property at Cranley and a 38-year-old man was charged.

He will appear in the Toowoomba Magistrates Court on June 23.

Acting detective senior sergeant Brendan Murphy said police had to act fast because the small gallstones are easy to dispose of.

South of Queensland in the state of New South Wales, animal activists reported shearers at a NSW property for abuse because they were upsetting the herd with abusive language.

While the case has been dropped, the issue came up at a Senate estimates hearing on Tuesday with Nationals senator John Williams demanding to know if department officials had received any formal complaints – from the sheep themselves.

“Not yet senator,” policy official Fran Freeman said.

Triathlon champ puts Salmonella behind

The Bahama Islands Info reports that with a bout of salmonella behind him, 2-time Pineappleman Sprint Triathlon champion Simon Lowe, will be back to defend his title June 6 in Gregory Town, Eleuthera.

poster4_high_res_488162693“I was sicker than I have ever been in my life,” said Lowe, 32, of the illness that kept him out of Treasure Cay, Abaco’s triathlon in March. “I was out of training for about a month and when I started again in early February it was very disheartening because it felt like I was starting again from scratch. After a few weeks though I felt the fitness coming back and I am now pretty much where I was before the illness happened.”

Nosestretcher alert: Australian food porn contestant suffers food poisoning (but it didn’t happen on the show)

A contestant on Australian food porn show, My Kitchen Rules, has been forced to pull out of the competition after being hospitalized for 15 days with food poisoning.

I’m sorry. Food poisoning sucks.

mkrProducers were quick to clarify Kaponias did not get ill during filming of Channel 7’s top-rating series, but was admitted to hospital after eating out during a production break.

Baby paleo diet wanker and judge Pete Evans broke the “sad and shocking” news as teams gathered to receive their scores from a pub grub challenge in Sydney’s Balmain.

Couldn’t a show with such popularity provide a tad more detail after a two-week hospitalization?

Food safety hopeless in Australia.

Not just from watching the show: Australian vet barfs on I’m a Celebrity … Get Me Out Of Here

It’s usually the celebs that end up vomiting on I’m A Celebrity … Get Me Out Of Here!

celebrity.barf.aust.mar.15But this time, it was Dr Chris Brown that couldn’t keep his food down.

Freddie Flintoff had the task of chowing down on critters during Tuesday night’s tucker trial.

He managed to down a giant snail, a cockroach and a rats tail but had to bow out when served a “critters jungle juice” — a smoothie of cockroaches, worms, fly pupae and crickets.

That’s when Dr Chris Brown decided to step in and see for himself how bad it was.

And it wasn’t good.

Dr Chris had to walk away to vomit into the bushes — leaving his co-host, Julia Morris, to manage the rest of the challenge.

That’s when Freddie stepped in to offer a rather robotic impression of the Bondi Vet.

50 shades of barf

Jamie Dornan was left vomiting after auditioning to star alongside Tom Cruise in Rock of Ages.

fifty-shades-grey-movie-release-dateThe 32-year-old, who plays Christian Grey in Fifty Shades of Grey, was left mortified after an attempt to boost his confidence before an audition backfired.
Jamie was hoping to land the lead role of Drew Boley and was tasked with performing a Foreigner song.

He said: “I had to sing Waiting For A Girl Like You. It’s nearly impossible to sing, and I’ve got quite a deep voice when I sing.

“My audition was at 10 in the morning on the Warner Brothers lot. I convinced myself it would be a good idea to have a bit of whiskey to relax my vocal cords and maybe as a bit of a confidence booster. I took a swig of Jameson and I instantly f**king puked.
“So I’m standing with all these executives driving around in golf carts, as I’m vomiting on the lot. It was a bad look.

“I hadn’t been clever enough to bring mouthwash. And then I had to go in, stinking of whiskey and vomit and proceed to sing Waiting For A Girl Like You, which I couldn’t sing.”

“It was the worst situation ever,” he added. “Obviously, I didn’t hear anything back.”

Vaccines work: So says Kristen Bell (and Israel)

Data on long-term impact of universal national vaccination programmes against hepatitis A are lacking. We aimed at evaluating the impact on hepatitis A incidence of the Israeli toddlers-only universal routine two-dose vaccination programme against hepatitis A initiated in 1999.

kristen-bell1All hepatitis A episodes reported to the national surveillance system from 1993 to 2012 were analysed in relation to the vaccination programme and coverage. Mean vaccine coverage in Israel between 2003 and 2010 was 92% for the first dose, given at 18 months of age, and 88% for the second dose, given at 24 months.

The annual hepatitis A incidence declined from a mean of 50.4 per 100,000 in the period between 1993 and 1998 to a mean of <1.0, during the period from 2008 to 2012, representing a reduction of >98%. The decline was evident in all ages and ethnicity groups, including unvaccinated populations.

Of the 1,247 cases reported nationwide between 2002 and 2012, the vaccination status could be ascertained in 1,108 (89%). Among them, only 20 (2%) were reported be vaccinated with one dose and three (<1%) received two doses.

The sustained results of this long-term impact study suggest that a toddlers-only universal routine two-dose vaccination programme is highly effective and practical. These findings underscore the importance of sustainability in both the surveillance systems and vaccination programmes and will aid to determine vaccination policies.

The impact of a national routine immunisation programme initiated in 1999 on Hepatitis A incidence in Israel, 1993 to 2012

Euro Surveill. 2015;20(7)

Levine H, Kopel E, Anis E, Givon-Lavi N, Dagan R.

http://www.eurosurveillance.org/ViewArticle.aspx?ArticleId=21040

http://www.today.com/parents/kristen-bell-get-vaccinated-whooping-cough-if-you-want-hold-2D80499716

And Penn and Teller (NSFV).

Bugs cured by wellness?

Jane Hansen of The Daily Telegraph writeskellogg that the so-called wellness industry has an unhealthy dark side that needs exposing.

Increasingly it is revealed parents are not vaccinating their children, and feeding kids potentially deadly raw milk for the “healthy” bacteria on the advice of their alternative therapist.

While most of the professional bodies for alternative practitioners have now come out with position statements in support of vaccination, in practice many are quietly advising their patients not to vaccinate, fuelling a discredited link to autism, and directing parents to feed their kids raw milk to treat illnesses such as autism.

A good deal of the chiropractic sector does not even believe in germ theory. They believe that as long as you pop along for your “wellness” tinkering every week, you won’t fall prey to infectious diseases.

Some leading chiropractors were members of the anti-vaccination group the AVSN, which once boasted that chiropractors were its greatest financial supporters.

Recent comments by Arizona chiropractor Heather Wolfson about a five-year-old who could not be vaccinated, and who died of chickenpox related complications, shows just how deranged chiropractic thinking can be.

“If this mother would have sought out chiropractic care, gave just two simple vitamins A and C, she would have never developed pneumonia … This little girl is dead, not from chickenpox, but from chemicals and poor nutrition.”

I would like to see those chiropractors who don’t believe in germ theory to head to ebola-stricken Africa to put their craft to the test.

kellogg.bibiologicThe wellness industry lives by the mantra “food is medicine”, a term deeply embedded in the anti-vax movement.

Amid its advice is to drink raw milk. As naturopath Helen Goodwin wrote, this is the only way it should be drunk, “as the beneficial bacteria lactobacillus acidophilus is still alive”.

But Goodwin acknowledges the potential for harmful bacteria is the reason why it is illegal to sell raw milk for consumption in Australia.

It contains listeria and E.coli and other pathogens which recently caused the death of a Victorian toddler.

Coldplay is worst thing to happen to music, and Gwyneth is worst thing to happen to food; maybe that’s why they hooked up

There was this one time, that saint Gwyneth made everyone throw up, and shockingly, it wasn’t from the overwhelming nauseous feeling they got from hearing Gwyneth Paltrow talk about how perfect Gwyneth Paltrow is all evening.

"Mortdecai" Los Angeles premiere***NO DAILY MAIL SALES***It was from food!

That’s right, famous cookbook author Gwyneth Paltrow admitted on The Rachael Ray Show (via Glamour) Friday morning that she once made a meal that made everyone fill the 17th century gilded French porcelain toilets in her home with hot barf. Now, I’ve read both of Goopy’s cookbooks, and I’d say that roughly 79% of what I saw gave me the heaves (so many vegetables and not ONE recipe for Frito Pie). But according to Goopy, it wasn’t because she was serving her guests some kind of disgusting pickled heirloom kholrabi over mashed sunchoke bullshit; it was because she screwed up the recipe for eggplant parmesan.What do you think?

“I went to the store and bought some eggplant, a jar of tomato sauce, and some really rubbery mozzarella cheese. I didn’t know that when you cook eggplant, you first have to sweat it to get all the bitter juice out, and I didn’t realize that you also have to bread eggplant parmesan and fry it before. So I put slices of raw eggplant with jarred tomato sauce and mozzarella. And everyone threw up.”

What do you think?

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