Someone in VIP on Gronk’s party ship left pile of poop with $20 bill

This, somehow, counts as sports news.

Jake Brown of CBS Sport Radio reports: we have heard some stories of Rob Gronkowski’s party ship over the last couple of months. From all accounts, it seems like the ship was one hell of a time if you like to party.

US football player Rob Gronkowski poses as he arrives to the 2016 Vanity Fair Oscar Party on Sunday, February 28, 2016 in Beverly Hills, California. / AFP / ADRIAN SANCHEZ-GONZALEZ        (Photo credit should read ADRIAN SANCHEZ-GONZALEZ/AFP/Getty Images)

US football player Rob Gronkowski poses as he arrives to the 2016 Vanity Fair Oscar Party on Sunday, February 28, 2016 in Beverly Hills, California. / AFP / ADRIAN SANCHEZ-GONZALEZ (Photo credit should read ADRIAN SANCHEZ-GONZALEZ/AFP/Getty Images)

G Unit’s DJ Whoo Kid, who is a host on SiriusXM’s Shade 45 joined Brandon ‘Scoop B’ Robinson and I on the Brown and Scoop podcast on CBS Radio’s Play.it to give us a unique story from the party ship.

“We damn near messed up that boat so bad that we can never do a party on that cruise ship again. They banned us,” said Whoo Kid. “Somebody shatted and put a 20 dollar bill on the (expletive). They’re trying to go through all the cameras and try to figure out who (expletive) and put this $20 on there. On the VIP section by the pool.”

The question is who in VIP may have committed the…crime.

 

Blake Lively burger advice

Blake Lively should stick to acting or Ryan Reynolds or whatever she does.

blake.lively.hamburgerNot burgers.

As Lively revealed during the rapid-fire question-and-answer segment “The Cagle Exercise“, her go-to Umami Burger order involves the Manly Burger (which is topped with onion rings) and the “chili burger.”

“You cut them in half and you create one burger,” Lively said. “And then you give the other half to whoever you’re with.”

She added, “You eat it from the center and get a part of each.”

Use a thermometer and stick it in for safety.

barfblog.Stick It In

 

 

 

 

It’s called barfblog: Tori Spelling pukes in front of James Franco

Tori Spelling, best known to me as the inspiration of Beverly Hills 90210’s protest song, ‘Donna Martin Graduates’ was on Extra TV telling her tale of projectile vomit in front of showbiz and art everything, James Franco.

After living out her marital problems on reality TV, Tori Spelling is set to return to television in Lifetime’s reboot of the camp classic “Mother, May I Sleep With Danger?”

Tori worked on the remake with co-star James Franco, who was right in front of her when she vomited on the set. She admitted, “Sadly, that happened. It was so funny because I think he’s a genius. I was so excited to work with him. In 25 years in this business, I have never had a moment like this. I get on the set, my kids had the stomach flu and all of a sudden, I got it. We were filming all nights, this shoot, and it literally came out of nowhere, and I was like, ‘Oh, my gosh, I can’t even make it to a bathroom.’ I tried to get out of there and I couldn’t and I just bent down and projectile-vomited in front of James Franco…”

If it was noro-induced, the puke plume might have hit Franco.

Martine McCutcheon barfed on Simply Red singer during first date

Some-kind-of-Brit celeb Martine McCutcheon, 40, has revealed that she once found herself on the arm of the amorous Simply Red frontman, Mick Hucknall, now 56 – but things soon came to a sickly end when she vomited in his hair.

Mick Hucknall‘We met at a premiere,’ she recalled. ‘And I can’t eat, drinking the champagne and I’ve gone in the car, engine goes over, I [grumbled] like something out of the exorcist.’

Speaking on Loose Women on Wednesday, she added: ‘I [vomited on him]. He had dreadlocks. The dreadlocks flicked [into the vomit]. Not long after that, he had to cut his dreadlocks off!’

 

Top Gear: Chris Evans barfs after going too fast

During a segment about the Audio R8 2.0, the Radio 2 DJ had to pull over trackside so he could vomit on the road.

Top-Gear-679211He was doing laps in the car at the Laguna Seca, which is known for its corkscrew twists and turns, with motor racing champion Sabine Schmitz in the driver’s seat.

Chris, 50, seemed to be fine at the start but things went a bit pear-shaped when he seemed to look a little worse for wear.

“My stomach wants a divorce,” he told Sabine, 47, as she drove the car around the track.

Once they crossed the finish line on the first lap, Chris was seen panicking and telling Sabine: “Oh, slow down Sabine, please.”

“You need some fresh air?” she said with a laugh as Chris appeared to go slightly green.

He then released a profuse stream of swearing as the car ground to halt.

Chris managed to keep it together but he wasn’t faring too well as they went round again.

After completing the second lap, Chris said: “Stop, please stop!” He then proceeded to open the door and hurl up onto the tarmac.

“Woah! Go out! Go out!” Sabina exclaimed aa she shooed him out of the motor before Chris was heard vomiting.  

“Why is it red?” Sabine asked curiously, peering over his shoulder, Chris replied: “Strawberries, for breakfast.”

‘So You Think You Can Dance’ contestant vomits on Paula Abdul

As I’ve shared before, after successfully defending my PhD in 1996, and going out for lunch at which I ate hardly nothing, I barfed on the way back to the uni in the presence of my supervisor and external examiner.

chi-tahani-vomits-a3dc1ea2-cb87-4b4f-a97b-ffa3cf99d11bIt was laid out early I would write about barf.

Paula Abdul has dealt with many excited contestants in her time as TV competition judge, but she’s never had someone vomit on her during an audition… until now.

During Monday’s episode of “So You Think You Can Dance: The Next Generation,” young Chi Tahani gives it her all on stage. When she finds out she’s been promoted to the next round in the show, she hugs judge Nigel Lythgoe and the walks over to hug Abdul.

After the hug, Tahani’s cheeks puff up and Abdul asks, “Are you OK, honey?”

Tahani nods but then proceeds to vomit on Abdul.

“It’s OK, honey,” Abdul quickly assures her.

She then reflects, “I’ve never had anyone just vomit on me like that.”

Tahani explained after she left the auditorium, “She just squeezed me too tight and all the happiness came out on her jacket.”

 

The Men Who Stare at Goats: University of Alberta edition

According to wiki, which is always right, The Men Who Stare at Goats is a book by Jon Ronson concerning the U.S. Army‘s exploration of New Age concepts and the potential military applications of the paranormal. The title refers to attempts to kill goats by staring at them. The book is companion to a three-part TV series broadcast in Britain on Channel 4 — Crazy Rulers of the World (2004) — the first episode of which is also entitled “The Men Who Stare at Goats”. The same title was used a third time for a loose feature film adaptation in 2009.

spoon-bendingHallucinogenic drug use to make more aggressive soldiers in Vietnam was much more plausible – see Jacob’s Ladder.

Yet the intersect of science and the silly continues.

Universities are supposed to lead, not accommodate.

My buddy Tim Caufield, an academic lawyer who has found fame as the author of Is Gwenyth Paltrow Wrong About Everything (we served together on a biotech advisory committee for the Canadian government back in the day) was the first to call out his own academic institution for promoting bullshit.

According to CBC, after a healthy dose of online ridicule, the University of Alberta has cancelled a workshop at which doctors were supposed to learn to bend spoons.

With their minds.

When Tim Caulfield first spotted a poster for the event, he didn’t understand what he was seeing.

“When I first saw the post I thought it might be a magic show,” said the professor of health law and science policy at U of A. “But this wasn’t being presented as that, or as satire, it was being presented as a real event where you’re supposed to use the power of your mind to bend spoons.”

The seminar, titled simply “Spoon Bending and the Power of the Mind,” was arranged by the university’s Complementary and Alternative Research and Education program or CARE, as part of the Pediatric Integrative Medicine Rounds, a series of monthly seminars presenting a specialist in the field of integrative medicine to a clinical audience. 

goat.startingWhen Caulfield heard about event, he immediately tweeted about it causing many on social media to ridicule the workshop and the university.

It was to be taught by Anastasia Kutt, an Edmonton “energy healer” who specializes in reiki, a form of therapy in which the practitioner is believed to channel energy into the patient in order to encourage healing. 

On her website, Kutt said she “has been studying [and] experiencing techniques such as yoga, meditation, and other energy healing techniques for over 10 years.”

Her website explains energy healing as “removing issues and stress from your energetic field, to bring it into balance and its original state of good health.”

She has taught similar seminars on spoon bending, also described as PK bending — psychokinesis bending.

Kutt is also a research assistant in the CARE program and co-ordinates the education arm of the program.

The poster boasts that at the end of the day, 75 per cent of the doctors, with guidance from Kutt, would be able to bend spoons solely with their minds. 

It’s a notion that Caulfield, along with many others online, scoffed at.

“Spoon bending is kind of ironic because it’s been debunked so often,” said Caulfield.

“There is absolutely no physical way you can bend a spoon with your mind. That’s why it’s so frustrating that it’s being presented in this legitimate way at a science-based institution.” 

tim.caufieldThe event poster featured the disclaimer that states, “This workshop is experiential and is meant to spark interest. This will not be a scientific evaluation of the process.”

The University of Alberta released a statement saying the workshop had “been withdrawn by the presenters.”

For Caulfield, the issue is that programs like CARE lend legitimacy to these sorts of ideas, something he doesn’t believe an institute of higher learning should do.

“That’s my sort of umbrella concern with this,” Caulfield said. “Is these kind of programs legitimize the pseudo-science. The problem is, it always sort of slides into the embrace of pseudo-science.

“It’s always presented in a legitimate fashion. You don’t have that critical component to it, you’re working arm in arm with energy healers, reiki experts and homoeopathy practitioners.” 

He said he’s not sure what exact role the University of Alberta played in the organization, but it doesn’t matter anyway. The poster featured the university’s logo, which links the event directly to the institution. 

“It really does seem like they are part of academia and that, to me, is problematic.”

The program echoes of the now disbanded and disgraced University of Toronto Sick Kids’ MotherRisk program.

They’re the brilliant folks who said it was OK for moms-to-be to eat deli meats and soft cheeses as long as they came from reputable sources, in the wake of the Maple Leaf Listeria outbreak that killed 23 in Canada.

Is a $5.5 billion-a-year company reputable?

Latest food quacks peddling dangerous advice

The UK’s newest foodie stars, sisters Melissa and Jasmine Hemsley, purport themselves as healthy food gurus. In fact, one’s a former model, the other has a background in marketing. Following the release of their latest cookbook, experts claim their clean-eating, tongue-scraping advice could actually do more harm than good.

Hemsleys-embedJasmine, 36, has left her racy modelling past far behind. These days, she and sister Melissa, 30, are the self-styled queens of “clean eating”, a regime that forbids followers from eating sugar, gluten and processed foods, which are said to contain body-harming toxins.

The sisters, who have written two recipe books and set up their own cafe, can be found promoting such food fads as “spiralising”, a healthy eating gadget that turns vegetables into guilt-free “pasta”; bone broth, a collagen-rich soup made from boiling bones; and, just last week on their new UK Channel 4 TV show, astrologically farmed vegetables grown according to the cycles of the moon.

Critics say that by peddling the “clean eating” fad, the Hemsleys and their ilk – including “Deliciously” Ella Woodward – are causing vulnerable schoolgirls to become not only paranoid about food, but frightened of it.

In a society in which more young women than ever have troubled relationships with their bodies – 1.6 million people in Britain suffer from an eating disorder – this is cause for serious concern. Experts say just words such as “clean” and “cleanse” may trigger harmful behaviour.

“Clean eating uses the language of anorexics to describe food,” says Dr Richard Sly, a lecturer in mental health at the University of East Anglia. “When you place a label on such things, you are creating a judgment, one that vulnerable people will buy into.”.

The girls started tapping into Jasmine’s contacts in the TV and film world to find clients for whom they could cook healthy meals. In spring 2010, a well-known actor (whom the sisters refuse to name) asked them to help with his diet.

Before they knew it, they had a waiting list and their business was born. It was so exclusive they took on just six, super-elite clients at a time and were flown round the world as private chefs.

They set up a blog to document their work and, in 2012, it caught the attention of an editor at Vogue, who took them on as food columnists.

The Hemsley & Hemsley brand was co-founded by Jasmine’s boyfriend Nick Hopper, 40, a model and photographer, who took the pictures for their first book, The Art Of Eating Well, which has sold 150,000 copies.

Today, Jasmine and Nick live in a £585,000 flat in South-East London, while Melissa lives nearby with her boyfriend, Henry Relph, 32, a DJ and art collector.

Central to their success is their glamorous appearance and the glitzy social circles in which they move.

However, some of their dishes contain a lot of sugar – their “guilt-free” brownies have 150ml maple syrup, as well as 230g butter.

Even their “healthy” alternatives (honey, maple syrup and agave nectar) contain high levels of fructose, a natural sugar linked to diabetes, obesity and liver disease.

But most concerning of all are health ‘experts’ from whom the Hemsleys get their approach to food.

Last week, it was revealed that they support controversial diet guru Natasha Campbell-McBride, a Russian nutritionist criticised for her “Gut And Psychology Syndrome” (GAPS) doctrine, which claims that a restrictive, gluten-free diet can cure conditions including schizophrenia, autism and epilepsy. Despite not being legally registered to practise medicine in Britain, she bills herself on her UK website as “Doctor Natasha”.

Experts have branded her work “unethical” and “dangerous”, yet the Hemsleys cite her book at the top of a list of five that have “shaped their food philosophy”.

The Weston A Price Foundation, an American non-profit group founded by a dentist, is another inspiration.

Among the unorthodox practices it advocates are eating poached animal brains, feeding newborns raw cows’ milk and ingesting clay, believed to remove toxins from the body.

The sisters insist they “are not advocates of anyone else’s regime.

But leading doctor and Daily Mail columnist Max Pemberton says the doctrines they quote from are “absolute quackery”.

Their star may be on the rise, but maybe it’s time we started seeing the Hemsley sisters for what they really are: glossy beauties with an eye for making money – and not a shred of genuine expertise between them.

So is there any science behind the clean eating cult? We look at some of the most outlandish schools of thought that the Hemsleys support . . .

Biodynamic food

What is it? Based on the teachings of 19th-century Austrian philosopher Rudolf Steiner, it claims the best time to plant crops is two days before a full moon, when there is an increase in the moisture content of the soil, meaning plants “growth forces” are enhanced.

They say: In the latest episode of their cookery series, the sisters buy eggs produced by chickens fed on grain that has been “planted according to the astrological calendar”.

Liz Cotton of Orchard Eggs, the Hemsleys’ favourite biodynamic brand, explains: “The yolks are bright yellow and they taste better than organic.”

Experts say: There’s no difference – and certainly no nutritional benefit – in planting crops according to the solar system.

Dietitian Renee McGregor says some eggs are better for you than others, but this has to do with soil quality and farming conditions. “In terms of the moon, that’s a load of mumbo-jumbo,” she adds.

Tongue scraping

What is it? One of the sisters’ weirder obsessions, tongue scraping comes from Ayurvedic medicine, an ancient Indian practice.

It involves running a metal scraper – with padded handles and a sharp, curved middle – up and down your tongue to remove bacteria, fungi and food debris.

They say: “I’d rather go without brushing my teeth in the morning than not doing it,” Jasmine claims. “All your toxins come out on your tongue, so you want to remove them.”

Mindful eating

What is it? This Buddhist-inspired technique is all about taking your time over food, rather than wolfing meals down in minutes.

It encourages “reconnecting” with ingredients by paying attention to their colour, smell and texture.

They say: “If you develop a proper relationship with the food you are about to eat, it will taste better and you will feel fuller more quickly,” Jasmine claims.

They also say chewing food more slowly can “get rid of common digestive complaints”.

Experts say: It’s not complete quackery: taking time over eating can avoid indigestion and heartburn. But Jane Odgen, professor of health psychology at the University of Surrey, says this obsession with chewing “may make people over-focused on food”.

The gaps diet

What is it? Dreamed up by Russian nutritional “guru” Dr Natasha Campbell-McBride, this regime teaches that illnesses including autism, dyslexia, heart disease and epilepsy are caused by an “imbalance of intestinal flora”, which allows particles of food to escape into the blood.

GAPS – which stands for Gut And Psychology Syndrome – encourages followers to combat this by giving up sugar, dairy, starch and gluten.

They say: The Hemsleys, who cite Doctor Natasha as an influence, promote a gluten and refined sugar-free diet and warn against “leaky gut syndrome”.

Food combining

What is it? A naturopathic – in other words, not scientifically proven – theory that claims the order and combination in which you put food into your mouth can affect digestion. Also known as the Hay Diet, invented by American doctor William Howard Hay in the Thirties, it forbids eating protein and carbohydrates on the same plate.

They say: The sisters claim food combining “aids digestion and optimises nutritional absorption from our foods”.

Experts say: “There is absolutely no evidence for this,” says Renee McGregor. “Our body is capable of coping with food all on its own. It doesn’t need us interfering to help it work properly.”

Bone broth

What is it? Otherwise known as plain old stock, “bone broth” is one of the Hemsleys’ go-to recipes, made by boiling animal bones in water with vegetables, peppercorns and bay leaves for 24 hours.

Fancy dog food ain’t safe dog food: A ‘spoonful’ for Serena Williams edition

Serena Williams tried her 3-year-old dog’s hotel dog food and got one whopper of a stomach ache afterward, according to a Snapchat video.

“That looks better than my food,” reasoned Williams in a video, now available on YouTube, in which she explains why she decided to have a bite of her dog’s gourmet meal. “I’m like, what the heck, I’m gonna try a piece. It looks good.”

Williams, who uploaded the video to Snapchat to avoid “hating,” knew exactly what people might think about her taste test: “Don’t judge me, I ate a spoonful.”

Turns out, this was definitely no delicious spoonful. Two hours later, she said, “I just ran to the toilet like, like I thought I was going to pass out.”

The “force-swallowed” bite tasted “a little bit like house cleaner,” she said, adding with a laugh, “Chip liked it and it looked good … I don’t think it’s consumable for humans.”

The star sighed at the end of the video, and said, “So now I feel really sick.”

Williams managed to qualify for the Italian Open hours later (and won yesterday.

Please ignore: Katy Perry drinks apple cider vinegar

Whenever I visited my grandparents, this bored kid would check out the tabloids lying around, the real news of the world, the National Enquirer.

apple.cider.vinegarGlamour magazine reports (???) that Katy Perry recently opened up about the reason she says she’s been able to work so tirelessly: She drinks unpasteurized apple cider vinegar.

The singer tells SELF that she started drinking Bragg Apple Cider Vinegar for her health on the advice of her mom while growing up. Instead of having soda, she’d drink the vinegar, which contains the “mother,” i.e., stringy strands in the vinegar where probiotics and other nutrients are found.

This BS has been flogged for centuries.

Don’t take food advice from celebrities.

Don’t take any advice

Enjoy their, um, art.

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